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Ep. 412: Jeannette Horton, NuLeaf

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep. 412: Jeannette Horton, NuLeaf

Ep. 412: Jeannette Horton, NuLeaf

Jeanette Horton joins us and shares NuLeaf’s intentions to help communities disproportionately affected by the war on drugs: “You could say this money is going to go to expungements, or job training, funding businesses. People have good intentions, but the businesses and the people that benefited from those funds ended up being white. The point was that only African Americans are disproportionately arrested, and so, that’s where that reinvestment needed to be, in the communities that were decimated.”

Transcript:

Seth Adler: Jeannette Horton joins us. Welcome to Cannabis Economy. I'm your host, Seth Adler. Download episodes on canneconomy.com. That's two N's and the word “economy”. First, a word from Nicole Smith in Evolab, and then Jeannette Horton.

Nicole Smith: New technologies are emerging that are really amazing, and it's allowed us to do more, right? I mean, the things that have evolved, that's one of the things that we currently talk about is that Evo as a company is almost a decade into CO2 extraction and technology development. That's a lifetime in this industry.

Seth Adler: Well, if cannabis years are dog years, which they are.

Nicole Smith: Right. That's what I hear. Right?

Seth Adler: Exactly, that's what they tell me. Exactly.
So, Jeannette Ward, thanks so much for giving us a few minutes. It's been too long. It's been so long that you're Jeannette Horton now.

Jeanette Horton: That's true, I've gotten married since we last spoke.

Seth Adler: So, you've moved. I think when last we spoke, you were on the East Coast. Now you're on the West Coast.

Jeanette Horton: Yes.

Seth Adler: The only reason I bring that up is because this NuLeaf thing, it seems like a good idea. There's so many ideas that are good ideas, right now, in the cannabis industry. Right?

Jeanette Horton: There are a lot of good ideas and there's so many good, smart people executing a lot of good ideas.

Seth Adler: Now, you were actually talking to, what was it? Coca-Cola, brand marketer, so it's not like you're just somebody with opinions. You actually know what a good idea is versus, you know.

Jeanette Horton: I'd like to think so.

Seth Adler: Someone's harebrained scheme.

Jeanette Horton: I'd like to think so.

Seth Adler: So let's just quick talk about NuLeaf, because I find it fascinating. I think it's great that you're doing that in Portland. It does sound scalable, I know that we're not focused on that right now, but what's the deal? What's the information that we need?

Jeanette Horton: The important thing for everyone to know is, Portland is the first city to invest money in the communities most disproportionately harmed by the war on drugs to invest cannabis tax money. California has gotten a lot of love for proposing it in their language, but it hasn't happened yet, and it's important that every city, every state make that kind of commitment with their cannabis tax dollars. This multi-billion dollar industry is profiting in tax dollars a lot of police forces, and it needs to be being reinvested in those communities most economically devastated by that war on drugs. Lots of people believe this, lots of people are on board for this. It actually practically happening the first time this year in Portland, when the money's actually showing up in these communities. NuLeaf was born from this. We are a nonprofit organization that gives funding, gives capital to businesses of color. We also have educational programs training, mentoring and just all around business coaching, for these businesses to help them scale, help them grow, and then we have a new professional arm which is for helping people of color find realistic successful career pathways as professionals in cannabis.

Seth Adler: Alright, so I want to kind of unpack all of this. First things first, how does it work in the city of Portland? How does the tax money actually get distributed? I won't say redistributed because that's a dog-whistle word.

Jeanette Horton: What does that mean, dog-whistle?

Seth Adler: It means that it has a meaning for certain people that means something like, it shouldn't have been redistributed.

Jeanette Horton: I see.

Seth Adler: My money that shouldn't have gone anywhere else, so how is the tax funds being distributed from cannabis in Portland? Two communities just disproportionately just affected by war on drugs.

Jeanette Horton: So that's what makes this local advocacy so important, and when I talked about California, it's gotten a lot of love for what they said they were going to do. The devil is in the details. The question you're asking is very important. How that money actually gets distributed is a really important thing for you to understand, and every state or city government is taking a different approach, and usually, it's a convoluted approach, so this is to be quite frank, no different. We've got some great advocates within the city of Portland who are fighting for this money to go to the right places, but it's in a budget kind of allocation to the budget distribution that seems to be controlled at levels above department city planning.

Seth Adler: Jeannette Horton joins us. Welcome to Cannabis Economy. I'm your host, Seth Adler. Download episodes on canneconomy.com. That's two N's and the word “economy”. First, a word from Nicole Smith in Evolab, and then Jeannette Horton.

Nicole Smith: New technologies are emerging that are really amazing, and it's allowed us to do more, right? I mean, the things that have evolved, that's one of the things that we currently talk about is that Evo as a company is almost a decade into CO2 extraction and technology development. That's a lifetime in this industry.

Seth Adler: Well, if cannabis years are dog years, which they are.

Nicole Smith: Right. That's what I hear. Right?

Seth Adler: Exactly, that's what they tell me. Exactly.
So, Jeannette Ward, thanks so much for giving us a few minutes. It's been too long. It's been so long that you're Jeannette Horton now.

Jeanette Horton: That's true, I've gotten married since we last spoke.

Seth Adler: So, you've moved. I think when last we spoke, you were on the East Coast. Now you're on the West Coast.

Jeanette Horton: Yes.

Seth Adler: The only reason I bring that up is because this NuLeaf thing, it seems like a good idea. There's so many ideas that are good ideas, right now, in the cannabis industry. Right?

Jeanette Horton: There are a lot of good ideas and there's so many good, smart people executing a lot of good ideas.

Seth Adler: Now, you were actually talking to, what was it? Coca-Cola, brand marketer, so it's not like you're just somebody with opinions. You actually know what a good idea is versus, you know.

Jeanette Horton: I'd like to think so.

Seth Adler: Someone's harebrained scheme.

Jeanette Horton: I'd like to think so.

Seth Adler: So let's just quick talk about NuLeaf, because I find it fascinating. I think it's great that you're doing that in Portland. It does sound scalable, I know that we're not focused on that right now, but what's the deal? What's the information that we need?

Jeanette Horton: The important thing for everyone to know is, Portland is the first city to invest money in the communities most disproportionately harmed by the war on drugs to invest cannabis tax money. California has gotten a lot of love for proposing it in their language, but it hasn't happened yet, and it's important that every city, every state make that kind of commitment with their cannabis tax dollars. This multi-billion dollar industry is profiting in tax dollars a lot of police forces, and it needs to be being reinvested in those communities most economically devastated by that war on drugs. Lots of people believe this, lots of people are on board for this. It actually practically happening the first time this year in Portland, when the money's actually showing up in these communities. NuLeaf was born from this. We are a nonprofit organization that gives funding, gives capital to businesses of color. We also have educational programs training, mentoring and just all around business coaching, for these businesses to help them scale, help them grow, and then we have a new professional arm which is for helping people of color find realistic successful career pathways as professionals in cannabis.

Seth Adler: Alright, so I want to kind of unpack all of this. First things first, how does it work in the city of Portland? How does the tax money actually get distributed? I won't say redistributed because that's a dog-whistle word.

Jeanette Horton: What does that mean, dog-whistle?

Seth Adler: It means that it has a meaning for certain people that means something like, it shouldn't have been redistributed.

Jeanette Horton: I see.

Seth Adler: My money that shouldn't have gone anywhere else, so how is the tax funds being distributed from cannabis in Portland? Two communities just disproportionately just affected by war on drugs.

Jeanette Horton: So that's what makes this local advocacy so important, and when I talked about California, it's gotten a lot of love for what they said they were going to do. The devil is in the details. The question you're asking is very important. How that money actually gets distributed is a really important thing for you to understand, and every state or city government is taking a different approach, and usually, it's a convoluted approach, so this is to be quite frank, no different. We've got some great advocates within the city of Portland who are fighting for this money to go to the right places, but it's in a budget kind of allocation to the budget distribution that seems to be controlled at levels above department city planning.
And it seems to be outside of the normal budget process, because I'm actually very involved in the budget process for the city. I've been elected to a bureau advisory committee because I wanted more understanding of how the government worked and how they distributed budgets, and the budget for this actually doesn't come from the city's formal public budget, so it makes it harder to find and harder to make sure this money goes to the right places and actually goes to the people most disproportionally impacted by the war on drugs, because here's the rough certainly in Oregon. You could say this money is going to go to expungements, or this money is going to go to job training, and this money is going to go to funding businesses, and then when you look around, people have good intentions, but the businesses and the people that got benefited from those funds ended up being white. And I know these people needed that help, but that was not the point. The point was that only African Americans are disproportionately arrested, and so, that's where that reinvestment needed to be, in the communities that were decimated.
And so, that's when I say the devil is in the details, when somebody has to stay on top of it and stay and watch these funds and follow them to the end to make sure that they've benefited The communities that were intended to be benefited. So how does the budget process work? It's a little convoluted, but what I'll tell everyone listening to this is, find out what's supposed to work in your state. Everyone in California needs to be talking to the people at state level and being in their faces, to make sure that when the budget does get allocated from these tax dollars, it goes where it's supposed to go to these communities.

Seth Adler: What have we seen, if it's kind of nebulous to find exactly from top down exactly, how the process works? What kind of funds have we seen out of the city and where specifically have they gone?

Jeanette Horton: Not enough. I think the total amount was around $350,000?

Seth Adler: Okay. That's more than I have.

Jeanette Horton: That's not enough. Yes, but that money got spread across expungements, across investments in this high school program, across capital funding to businesses. I mean, $350,000 would be a raise for a retail store any day of the week, but we got a portion of that to fund businesses.

Seth Adler: For the entire community. So, let's first talk about first things first. If folks aren't familiar with expungement, let's go through that very quickly.

Jeanette Horton: So we're not doing expungements, but people don't know that's being funded through the district attorney's office, but expungements are where people's records for cannabis is removed, so if you've got a cannabis crime, it's removed from your record and then it no longer hinders you from being able to get a loan for tuition, or get federal housing or a number of things, or actually, any apartment complex might reject you for having felonies, so it blocks you from a lot of things that are critical to ... just kind of, life.

Seth Adler: In the 21st century.

Jeanette Horton: Yeah, so you need that off your record. It's a tool for keeping people oppressed and economically depressed.

Seth Adler: What's the high school thing?

Jeanette Horton: Some of the funds are going to Rosemary Anderson High School here in Portland. They've got a really lovely program for the [inaudible 00:07:56] African American neighborhood and that's more of their students and they've got a really great program for success for high school students, so that's another place that the funding is going. It's going to some really great places, it's just not enough.

Seth Adler: Okay. The business part, that's your part, what have we seen and what are we doing? You know, with already that $350,000 which is a lot for me, but not necessarily for a retail shop.

Jeanette Horton: So again, we didn't get all of that. We get a portion of that, but a portion of that $350,000 to fund businesses. And we are reusing the money for both Focus 3 programs, for funding businesses, for providing education and technical assistance to businesses, and then for creating a pathway for professionals, an internship kind of pipeline for cannabis professionals to find their path in the industry.

Seth Adler: Now that we're finally at New Leaf, let's unpack that three legged stool. Which leg would you like to discuss first?

Jeanette Horton: So right out of the gate, we're already funding businesses here in Portland, Oregon, so to be clear that the businesses have to have a residency in Portland, Oregon. They can also be in other states, but they have to at least have a residency in Portland, Oregon. The business has to be 51% owned by someone of color. And then, once you've set aside those two requirements, you could apply for funds from NuFuel. So NuFuel is the program where we're already funding businesses that qualify, and we're just giving them money. It's just as plain as that. We're writing checks because you need money to operate a business, especially, I think right now, most cannabis businesses are working to be profitable. It is a sustainable, scalable way, and so we are funding these businesses in order to help them to reach solvency, and then to reach scale. Those are two measures that we've helped businesses achieve solvency and/or scale.

Seth Adler: So, forgetting scale for a minute, just solvency. We talked about harebrained schemes earlier. This is an industry for entrepreneurs, and there are a lot of people that are very interested in getting involved. That doesn't necessarily mean that they have cogent business plans. How do you ensure that businesses that you're funding that do, kind of, hit that first two criteria are going to be here, that are going to last?

Jeanette Horton: We have a really rigorous application process for NuFuel, and I don't say that to discourage people from applying. If you're a CEO, if you're a business in being strategic and thoughtful, you can bang out this application in a few hours. But, we do ask a lot of questions about your business, about your competitive differentiation, about your plans for scale and sustainability. We ask for you to describe the ROI for the funding, so what's your use of funds and what's your return on investments on that. What we're doing with all those questions is really, trying to answer the question you're asking, Seth. Do we believe in this business? Do we believe that the leadership is being thoughtful and has an amazing competitive product? Because we want to fund successful businesses for a long term. They're out there, we've got a number of businesses we're already funding because there are these amazing businesses owned by people of color who just need capital to fuel their growth.

Seth Adler: Then, let's just quickly talk about scale. If one thing is just solvency, next thing is scale. What are we talking about there? How is that different?

Jeanette Horton: It's different in that we fund businesses who are in solvency, or are still seeking solvency. We fund them through a fast track process, so we give them funds faster. And I think that's because business in that position ... what we're trying to do is help keep businesses from going out of business. I'm trying to help businesses bridge these gaps that they have when you're really running your business on investment.

Seth Adler: And so that can be, what you're saying is that can be a small business, but that could also be a sizable business trying to achieve scale, that if they don't hit ... kind of, the cash on hand type situation to get to that next clear big step?

Jeanette Horton: But those are going to be the smaller businesses. I'm still looking for some and see. The larger businesses are going to be the ones and the ones we've seen apply for funding are the larger, more established businesses who really just need scale. They're looking to hire more people so they can grow. They're looking to fund a new line of business. We've got a retailer who wants to add delivery, they don't have delivery today, so that's the kind of project for scale we would fund.

Seth Adler: Perfect. Wonderful.

Jeanette Horton: Solvency is truly a cash crisis. I mean, we don't want ... In a situation like that, we talk through these businesses on their business plans to make sure that we're not throwing money into a money pit. If it's a cash crisis, we do want to know how you pay your bills next month and how you are a business that will stand the test of time, you just need the capital to get there.

Seth Adler: There we go. All right. Funding businesses, number one. There's two more. What do we want to take next?

Jeanette Horton: So I think the next one would be NuSchool, because it's happening now as well. NuSchool is the program to really mentor and coach these businesses, and pair them with the right technical assistance and education for them to upscale.

Seth Adler: We would not call this an incubator or we would call this an incubator?

Jeanette Horton: It's not an incubator. So an incubator, for me, is more two things. Kind of much earlier in incubation, I'm incubating my idea, but also, it's much more ... I always think of an incubation like I think of the house in that show.

Seth Adler: Silicon Valley?

Jeanette Horton: Yes. And so, there is much more communal and spending a lot more time together, which requires a bit of unplugging from the real world, to go and stew these weeks of an incubation. And we're not for that startup business, that's still incubating an idea. We are for the business that's already launched, and is already running. You know, you're a young entrepreneur with your business in the market, you don't have time to go sit in a house and do an incubation. You need quick advice in the moment, in the crisis, in the challenge, and we are more surgical and precision in terms of where are the things we can [inaudible 00:14:33] with you, solve that problem, fix that area, and then pick back up in four months when you're having another issue.

Seth Adler: Got it. All right. So we are dealing with businesses that are in business, that just need further help. So NuFuel, NuSchool, what's the third one?

Jeanette Horton: NuProfessional is for the person who wants to get into the cannabis industry, or who is here and wants to grow. It's for the professional, they're likely college educated, and they have worked a couple of years already somewhere. They're ready to really move forward with a professional path in cannabis, and then we provide them with pathways to do that. And I say pathways loosely, because we're still developing some of the tenants of this program. But two things we will do, is we will have workshops, that's résumé writing and strategies for using Linkedin, and that kind of thing that a professional would need to help them position themselves. And then, we will have a program that's like internships for going into companies that are like Phylos Bioscience and working in their operations to gain cannabis knowledge and experience that builds their résumés in a practical, valuable way.

Seth Adler: Can I make a suggestion for NuProfessional as well?

Jeanette Horton: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Seth Adler: And I'm certainly okay if you say no. It's not something I haven't heard before. No.

Jeanette Horton: Right.

Seth Adler: Very senior level executives with a tremendous amount of experience who happen to be people of color, who could really actually help the cannabis industry, and why not, while we're at it, make sure that they're women. So, EVPs, SVPs, very high level vice presidents specifically even in financial services who would like to get into the cannabis industry, or who may be, aren't necessarily interested into getting into the cannabis industry, but those are exactly the executives that we need. Please come on in. The, what, risk isn't as high as it was. You can actually kind of do something completely different. You can build an industry from nothing. Are we interested in these kinds of people at NuProfessional, or is that a whole different thing?

Jeanette Horton: Well, we were targeting more two to three years in there, yeah, versus someone as high as say, that level. Why that level? I'm curious, that felt really specific.

Seth Adler: Because, any ... But I'm now appealing to you as a woman. Basically, there was a tremendous amount of women ownership, women leadership, female ownership, female leadership early on. Whhen you and I first met, that certainly was the case. CEOs abounded. That is not necessarily the case anymore, and so that's just my appeal.

Jeanette Horton: Interesting.

Seth Adler: Chew on it.

Jeanette Horton: Yeah, we'll chew on it.

Seth Adler: I mean, for people like you, there's not a lot of people like you that can just be installed in no matter what the company is and just kind of roll. So it's fantastic to bring folks into the industry. Also, I do think that we do need to focus on that top shelf, so to speak.

Jeanette Horton: We do. The idea for NuProfessionals is the pipeline for people to grow to that top shelf.

Seth Adler: Of course.

Jeanette Horton: I see your point, that someone could certainly say, “Let's just start recruiting at the top shelf level.” I'd love to see that. We're going to focus on the ones who will grow to the top ... Why do I keep saying “top shelf”? Who will grow to that C-Suite level.

Seth Adler: Yeah, I said “top shelf”. That was my terminology. Those were not your words, these were my words. What else is going on? Anything else that you want to talk about?

Jeanette Horton: I think I'm a broken record about capital. I think of a broken record, because I sit in this space in between as VP of Marketing and Communications at MJ Freeway, with our [inaudible 00:19:00] merger with MTech on the table, at the close of which we're projected to have 58 million balance sheet. That's a lot of money. And then, I'm on the other side with thirty thousand dollar checks for businesses. And I'm grateful that we've got something, because that's a start, but that's the imbalancing capital, and I sit in between the two and want to see more balance. I want to see the same kind of investment in businesses of color that we see in other businesses.

Seth Adler: So, I tend to think that cannabis is a different business, different industry, a better industry, we can build a better industry here. What you just described is basically, what, capitalism as I understand it? I mean, obviously, NuLeaf is-

Jeanette Horton: Well, it is and it isn't, because capitalism isn't straight capitalism. I mean, the math, the data that says that businesses of color are underfunded, and female businesses, I mean, the CEO of MJ Freeway is a female, so she's breaking barriers, and the fact that her company has got this amazing deal at all, that's a whole success story on its own. But, that being said, the data says that women and minorities get capital in any industry, far fewer than rates than white people, white owned businesses. But that's not pure capitalism, that's capitalism with a layer of prejudice and racial bias.

Seth Adler: Without question. And so, I wonder how can we kind of change that reality, which is a true reality, simply in this industry?

Jeanette Horton: That's exactly what we're trying to do. And so, that's my point.

Seth Adler: What do you need others to ... If other folks are either in the industry or trying to get into the industry, what else should they know? What else can they do?

Jeanette Horton: It ended up with it locally. So NuLeaf was just a result of local advocacy through myself and my husband, living here in Portland. We would tell everyone to go create your own NuLeaf locally. But if you would want us to help, we'd be happy to tell you how we did it and what we did, because this is a model that should spread. What the other thing I want is more money. I want the well funded businesses who care about this, about equity in the industry, we say that's part of their ethos, so then support it with funding. There's a small bit of funding from each of these well capitalized businesses, but allow us to fund just a few. I mean, just creating a couple of businesses of color that are successful are enabling them to have a more successful path, it spreads. I'm very optimistic in that way. We just need people to help us start it, and the wildfire will spread.

Seth Adler: So, I feel like that's a terrible analogy, considering right now, what's happening-

Jeanette Horton: That's a terrible analogy, [inaudible 00:22:04] actual wildfire.

Seth Adler: That is why, though, it's on your mind, and so, obviously our hearts, thoughts and prayers, along with actual resources hopefully are getting to California.

Jeanette Horton: Yeah, thoughts and prayers and actual help.

Seth Adler: Yeah, exactly. So, can I put you on the spot as the person that is both things? What might a ... I'll kind of anonymize it, what might a MJ Freeway do and MJ Freeway do for this cause?

Jeanette Horton: Wasn't anonymized at all.

Seth Adler: Slightly anonymized.

Jeanette Horton: MJ Freeway, or any other company, would contribute finances and knowledge, so I just had a lovely conversation this week from someone from, I will anonymize them, but although it was a lovely conversation, just ... She, within that organization, a cannabis company, was very excited about this issue. And she was contributing her thoughts and times to developing our new professional program, but she saw how there could be a benefit to businesses and how she could help us run a class, and that also, is extremely helpful, so if a company says, “I don't have money,” we love your time, but if you ... For some companies, honestly writing us a thousand dollar check would be faster and more efficient for them.

Seth Adler: So, “A thousand dollars, we accept a thousand dollars. Okay, great. But time and mindshare, also very valuable, and thank you so much.” That type of thing. I can't remember how many times I've interviewed you with microphones, because you're one of the people I speak to more often without microphones. So, did we do three final questions for returning guests, I wonder?

Jeanette Horton: I don't know.

Seth Adler: It sounds like this. What would you change about yourself, if anything? What would you change about anything else, if you could? And on the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on there? That's always the last question. But let's-

Jeanette Horton: We did do that. I remember, we did do-

Seth Adler: Yeah, no. That's always, yeah. But what would you change about yourself, if anything? It might be something you're already working.

Jeanette Horton: I'm always working on so many things that right now, I'm just trying to figure out which one would be most appropriate to share.

Seth Adler: Prioritizing? Would that be something you should work on?

Jeanette Horton: Yes, prioritizing. I'm really trying to work on being ... Here's the one that I'm really trying to work on, because I'm doing so much. I talked in the beginning about my son, mom so hard. I'm trying to mom and wife and work and nonprofit and there's all the things, and then be a friend, trying to be a friend and a daughter in the extra world. I'm trying to be thoughtful and present because there's too many things, and yeah, I'm doing all the things, but multitasking the things to not doing any of the things, really. And I'm just trying to be thoughtful and present. That's a thing I'm working on.

Seth Adler: I appreciate that. What I will say is that you and I and your son and your husband's spent some time, just a few days ago ... I would say that you and I hung out for about seven minutes total, considering all of your other things that you were just talking about. But I did feel as though you were present for those seven minutes, and I'll take them.

Jeanette Horton: Good. That's good.

Seth Adler: I will also, I don't know if it's appropriate, but I feel like I should point out the fact that you're not wearing matching socks, and your husband said that you never wear matching socks.

Jeanette Horton: It's not worth my time, like, let me go find a matched sock. I've got more important things to do.

Seth Adler: My favorite thing to learn was that you just don't care.

Jeanette Horton: I don't.

Seth Adler: So, what would you change about anything else if you could? Obviously, we talked about communities disproportionately affected by the war on drugs that, maybe try to take something different. Or it might just be that.

Jeanette Horton: Oh my goodness, sleep until seven thirty every morning.

Seth Adler: How far are we off from that? How many hours ...

Jeanette Horton: It's usually waking up at six fifteen.

Seth Adler: So we're close. We're in the neighborhood. We need more work there. Fair enough. On the soundtrack of your life, one track, one song that's got to be on there?

Jeanette Horton: I don't know, because I did this last time. I picked out Cass to be [inaudible 00:26:25] that has to be but, I don't know. Right now, I'm living by, there's a rapper called Lil Baby who's from Atlanta. Anyway, so right now, “Freestyle” is my anthem, which is not a new song, but that's what I'm living with right now, is “Freestyle”.

Seth Adler: That's the one.

Jeanette Horton: I miss Atlanta, I miss home, and it turns out he went to the same high school, Lil Baby, as my little brother, so for me, it made a lot of sense why I loved that song so much. And then I realized that he's about the same age as my brother too, so there's just a lot of synergy there. I could feel the energy of home in this particular freestyle.

Seth Adler: Huh. Well, that is a thoughtful answer, I very much appreciate it. You were very present when answering that. And not to the-

Jeanette Horton: Yeah, that song for me has gotten really emotional about it, because it reminds me so much of home, so it really made a lot of sense for my little brother went, “Yeah, we went to high school together,” and I was like, “Oh, wow!” Heard he dated his sister for a really long time, so it made a ton of sense that I felt home in this particular song.

Seth Adler: Lil Baby's sister dated your little brother?

Jeanette Horton: Right.

Seth Adler: Okay, fair enough.

Jeanette Horton: Right. It felt like home for a reason. I didn't know any of that until I told my little brother, but it was like my new song I was listening to on repeat for like, months, because it reminded me of home. Listen to it, though, and then you'll-

Seth Adler: I absolutely will. I can't wait.

Jeanette Horton: Everyone should listen to “Freestyle” and you can see what my ... you're going to get a slice of me and my life.

Seth Adler: That guy can hear it, I can feel, maybe, your ... when you were growing up, but how much does this have to do with the fact that you have a “Lil Baby”?

Jeanette Horton: Nothing.

Seth Adler: Nothing. Okay, that's not what this is about. That's not what this is about.

Jeanette Horton: Not related.

Seth Adler: I just feel like if I were a recording artist, I wouldn't choose that moniker. Do you know what I mean?

Jeanette Horton: There's a lot of “Lil”s in rap. Lil Wayne, Lil Yachty. Lots, actually.

Seth Adler: You know what I might choose? MC Hummus. Just because that ... I really do think, by the way, as far as world peace-

Jeanette Horton: It's not terrible.

Seth Adler: There you go. And as far as world peace is concerned, it's, world peace probably is going to start in the Middle East.

Jeanette Horton: I like Lil Hummus better.

Seth Adler: Lil Hummus? Well, sure. That's more appropriate.

Jeanette Horton: It's more modern. People don't say “MC” anymore.

Seth Adler: Well, but now, I feel like the “Lil” thing is going to go also. That's-

Jeanette Horton: It [inaudible 00:28:52]. We'll just see what's next.

Seth Adler: Well, the throwback thing is not going to work? I mean, clearly, I'm Gen X. You know what I'm saying?

Jeanette Horton: Yes.

Seth Adler: I think we're done here.

Jeanette Horton: I think so.

Seth Adler: Jeannette Ward Horton, thank you so much for your time, very much appreciate it and looking forward to checking in with you now and then.

Jeanette Horton: Great. Thank you for the time.

Seth Adler: And there you have Jeannette Horton. Very much appreciate her time, very much appreciate your time. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.