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Ep. 427: Lilach Power, Giving Tree Dispensary

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Ep. 427: Lilach Power, Giving Tree Dispensary

Ep. 427: Lilach Power, Giving Tree Dispensary

As an Israeli living in the United States, Lilach Power, founder of Giving Tree Dispensary, has a unique perspective on the way regulations work in both countries. Because of the way regulations in the United States are going, Power predicts that the industry will eventually segment into three categories: pharmaceutical, wellness, and recreational. In addition to regulations, Power discusses the hopes she has for the state of Arizona, her business, and banking reform.

Transcript:

Seth Adler: Lilac hour returns. Welcome to cannabis economy, I'm your host, Seth Adler. Download episodes on Canneconomy.com, that's two N's and the word economy or wherever you currently get your podcasts. Canneconomy.com has a ton of direct insight these days from business policy and scientists in space. First a word from Juana brands and then Lilac power.
Wanna know with Juana brands? Nancy, consumer education.

Nancy: I think what is gonna happen longer term in this industry, is that in order to really grow the total pie, we need a lot more consumer education. People really need to understand more about cannabis and they need to understand how to use it in a way that's effective and comfortable for them. And we need to also educate medical professionals so that they can educate the folks who they're working with.

Speaker 3: Here's people that walking by 'cause we're outdoors...you know what that is right?

Speaker 4: That's pretty cool.

Speaker 3: Yeah, what sea is this?

Speaker 4: Mediterranean.

Speaker 3: Yeah. Like you've looked at me like, 'uh oh, did you really not know that that's the Mediterranean sea.' We're here in Israel. Lilac Power. You're Israeli.

Speaker 4: I am.

Speaker 3: Usually you're in Arizona.

Speaker 4: Usually.

Speaker 3: But this is home.

Speaker 4: This is home.

Speaker 3: So you weren't born in Arizona, raised in Babylonia. Like King Tut. No that's ridiculous to Steve Martin tom foolery. Anyway, so it's 2019, right, podcast land knows no time.

Speaker 4: Yeah.

Speaker 3: You and I have now known each other for too long.

Speaker 4: That is. Definitely in cannabis years.

Speaker 3: Right? So I would've called you, I wouldn't have called you in 2012 because I was only calling Colorado people and Washington people and then I found out about the California people and then, I was like, oh wait...medical cannabis. Oh this is interesting, yeah. Why don't we call Arizona, let's see, what's Lilac doin'. So that was 2013 let's say, now it's 2019. Of course things have changed, right?

Speaker 4: A little.

Speaker 3: You are not a multi state operator, right? Do you know MSOs. You know that term right

Speaker 4: I do know that, that's not...

Speaker 3: It's a parlance of our times.

Speaker 4: Yes it is. Definitely in the last, in the last six months, it's all we hear.

Speaker 3: That's it. Are you a multi state op or are you an international operator, ya know? Are you going down to Columbia everybody wants to know, right?

Speaker 4: I am going to to Columbia.

Speaker 3: I was actually asking you in passing.

Speaker 4: Oh funny, yeah so, Arizona vertically integrated. Still a great market there with everything that's happening.

Speaker 3: We didn't quite get adult use this 2016 but that's okay.

Speaker 4: We did not, no. We had other issues that election but hopefully 2020 will be our year. I am involved in a company in Israel.

Speaker 3: Which company? Did we talk about that?

Speaker 4: No, they're not...they just got their licenses. They're gonna be vertically integrated. We're just starting. Just got our approval for GMP for our construction documents so hopefully start building next month or two.

Speaker 3: So these are, is, pharmaceutical regulations.

Speaker 4: It is completely different.

Speaker 3: Yeah, how is it completely different, one wonders. How would you say to the American audience, what the international audience knows?

Speaker 4: The regulations, in terms of, even just the build art, of the grow and the extraction is completely different. Clean rooms, the way you need to transfer things, how you can store it. Everything has a process for it. Everything is going to be controlled and going to be audited. The cannabis, the grow, will be randomly tested by the third party five times during the process of grow. In Arizona it's not even mandatory testing.

Speaker 3: Right, We might get to it, yes? So just beware. Whereas it's definitely happening five times we're not letting you know when.

Speaker 4: It's, yeah. It's completely different. And I think it's a good things, right? Especially when we claim medical.

Speaker 3: Well, so there's that word, right? So first off, we've always kind of been for safe patient access.

Speaker 4: Yes.

Speaker 3: And what we meant in America, was, 'Are you testing it? Could you please just test it please?' Ya know. Please, just for the people, test the cannabis. So when we're talking about medical as opposed to what? Do you call in compassionate use? Are you one of those people?

Speaker 4: I call recreational use.

Speaker 3: Whoa whoa whoa. So you call the medical program in...that's what I'm asking. See what I mean?

Speaker 4: Oh, oh. In Arizona? I called well being.

Speaker 3: Well being. Compassionate use. Right, okay. As opposed to medical. You have ceased to call medical, 'medical.' Interesting.

Speaker 4: Yes, I mean, in Arizona it's well being. It's people treating themselves for different conditions. Now if a person use it for social anxiety, is that medical?

Speaker 3: Well that's the wellness stuff. But you also do have...we've spoken in the past...you have true medical patients that are taking cannabis for...

Speaker 4: Absolutely.

Speaker 3: So just bring us through one more time, real quick.

Speaker 4: Cancer, Crones, Epilepsy. We have very, very sick patients coming to the dispensary.

Speaker 3: Now the cannabis that you're giving them, you no longer call that medical cannabis? You call that compassionate use cannabis? I'm trying to make sure I understand what we're talking about.

Speaker 4: You call everything weird medical programs.

Speaker 3: It's the medical programs, so within Arizona it's medical, but you're saying...compared to what you're doing here in Israel, there are completely different standards.

Seth Adler: Lilac hour returns. Welcome to cannabis economy, I'm your host, Seth Adler. Download episodes on Canneconomy.com, that's two N's and the word economy or wherever you currently get your podcasts. Canneconomy.com has a ton of direct insight these days from business policy and scientists in space. First a word from Juana brands and then Lilac power.
Wanna know with Juana brands? Nancy, consumer education.

Nancy: I think what is gonna happen longer term in this industry, is that in order to really grow the total pie, we need a lot more consumer education. People really need to understand more about cannabis and they need to understand how to use it in a way that's effective and comfortable for them. And we need to also educate medical professionals so that they can educate the folks who they're working with.

Speaker 3: Here's people that walking by 'cause we're outdoors...you know what that is right?

Speaker 4: That's pretty cool.

Speaker 3: Yeah, what sea is this?

Speaker 4: Mediterranean.

Speaker 3: Yeah. Like you've looked at me like, 'uh oh, did you really not know that that's the Mediterranean sea.' We're here in Israel. Lilac Power. You're Israeli.

Speaker 4: I am.

Speaker 3: Usually you're in Arizona.

Speaker 4: Usually.

Speaker 3: But this is home.

Speaker 4: This is home.

Speaker 3: So you weren't born in Arizona, raised in Babylonia. Like King Tut. No that's ridiculous to Steve Martin tom foolery. Anyway, so it's 2019, right, podcast land knows no time.

Speaker 4: Yeah.

Speaker 3: You and I have now known each other for too long.

Speaker 4: That is. Definitely in cannabis years.

Speaker 3: Right? So I would've called you, I wouldn't have called you in 2012 because I was only calling Colorado people and Washington people and then I found out about the California people and then, I was like, oh wait...medical cannabis. Oh this is interesting, yeah. Why don't we call Arizona, let's see, what's Lilac doin'. So that was 2013 let's say, now it's 2019. Of course things have changed, right?

Speaker 4: A little.

Speaker 3: You are not a multi state operator, right? Do you know MSOs. You know that term right

Speaker 4: I do know that, that's not...

Speaker 3: It's a parlance of our times.

Speaker 4: Yes it is. Definitely in the last, in the last six months, it's all we hear.

Speaker 3: That's it. Are you a multi state op or are you an international operator, ya know? Are you going down to Columbia everybody wants to know, right?

Speaker 4: I am going to to Columbia.

Speaker 3: I was actually asking you in passing.

Speaker 4: Oh funny, yeah so, Arizona vertically integrated. Still a great market there with everything that's happening.

Speaker 3: We didn't quite get adult use this 2016 but that's okay.

Speaker 4: We did not, no. We had other issues that election but hopefully 2020 will be our year. I am involved in a company in Israel.

Speaker 3: Which company? Did we talk about that?

Speaker 4: No, they're not...they just got their licenses. They're gonna be vertically integrated. We're just starting. Just got our approval for GMP for our construction documents so hopefully start building next month or two.

Speaker 3: So these are, is, pharmaceutical regulations.

Speaker 4: It is completely different.

Speaker 3: Yeah, how is it completely different, one wonders. How would you say to the American audience, what the international audience knows?

Speaker 4: The regulations, in terms of, even just the build art, of the grow and the extraction is completely different. Clean rooms, the way you need to transfer things, how you can store it. Everything has a process for it. Everything is going to be controlled and going to be audited. The cannabis, the grow, will be randomly tested by the third party five times during the process of grow. In Arizona it's not even mandatory testing.

Speaker 3: Right, We might get to it, yes? So just beware. Whereas it's definitely happening five times we're not letting you know when.

Speaker 4: It's, yeah. It's completely different. And I think it's a good things, right? Especially when we claim medical.

Speaker 3: Well, so there's that word, right? So first off, we've always kind of been for safe patient access.

Speaker 4: Yes.

Speaker 3: And what we meant in America, was, 'Are you testing it? Could you please just test it please?' Ya know. Please, just for the people, test the cannabis. So when we're talking about medical as opposed to what? Do you call in compassionate use? Are you one of those people?

Speaker 4: I call recreational use.

Speaker 3: Whoa whoa whoa. So you call the medical program in...that's what I'm asking. See what I mean?

Speaker 4: Oh, oh. In Arizona? I called well being.

Speaker 3: Well being. Compassionate use. Right, okay. As opposed to medical. You have ceased to call medical, 'medical.' Interesting.

Speaker 4: Yes, I mean, in Arizona it's well being. It's people treating themselves for different conditions. Now if a person use it for social anxiety, is that medical?

Speaker 3: Well that's the wellness stuff. But you also do have...we've spoken in the past...you have true medical patients that are taking cannabis for...

Speaker 4: Absolutely.

Speaker 3: So just bring us through one more time, real quick.

Speaker 4: Cancer, Crones, Epilepsy. We have very, very sick patients coming to the dispensary.

Speaker 3: Now the cannabis that you're giving them, you no longer call that medical cannabis? You call that compassionate use cannabis? I'm trying to make sure I understand what we're talking about.

Speaker 4: You call everything weird medical programs.

Speaker 3: It's the medical programs, so within Arizona it's medical, but you're saying...compared to what you're doing here in Israel, there are completely different standards.

Speaker 4: There's completely different standards.

Speaker 3: How much investment to you think it would take in Arizona...how many shops do we have?

Speaker 4: 104 open.

Speaker 3: No, no. You, you.

Speaker 4: Oh. I have one.

Speaker 3: One. How much money would it be to just turn what you're doing in Arizona into what is needed to be done in Israel. For real. Can you throw out that kind of...what might it be, roughly?

Speaker 4: Big picture, same size facility. Converting it to GMP GP certification I would say four million.

Speaker 3: Four million?

Speaker 4: Dollars.

Speaker 3: For one shop. Now if that were ten shops, how might that change, in other words, how much of that is just because you have to do that initial investment and then if it's ten times over it's just, ya know, another four hundred grand. Or is it four million every time?

Speaker 4: For every, you know the growth facilities depends on where you do with it that's easier than the manufacturing process. I think it will be easier to burn and start over.

Speaker 3: Just burn it to the ground.

Speaker 4: It's like starting a pharmaceutical drug manufacturer. So we are completely different. I haven't seen any facility that is anywhere close to those standards.

Speaker 3: Alright so manufacturing, that's four million dollars and then, again, lets just do a grow. How much would that be if you just did forget about manufacturing now just...

Speaker 4: The grow is much easier.

Speaker 3: So how much investment do you think you would...

Speaker 4: Well I was including both together and I would say three million is for manufacturing, one million...but I have a small grow.

Speaker 3: Over there...and one million over here. Square footage, would you like to share that?

Speaker 4: Yeah it's about ten thousand. So that is not as much as others.

Speaker 3: No, that is not as much as others. We would agree. So we can take these into account but it's a nice kind of bench mark to let folks know what kind of investment is needed to do what folks are doing in Israel and what folks tell me they are doing in Europe.

Speaker 4: Yes.

Speaker 3: So what do we do? Do we just, as business owners in the United States of America, just end even Canada? Just go ahead and do this?

Speaker 4: I would definitely recommend it, I would. It's an interesting market though, right?

Speaker 3: What is, the US?

Speaker 4: The US.

Speaker 3: Because it's not federally legal, still?

Speaker 4: Because we live on islands.

Speaker 3: Of states.

Speaker 4: Yes. Every state.

Speaker 3: We lived in our little laboratories of democracy.

Speaker 4: Yeah, every state is it's own island and that means we're gonna, I think we're gonna see a lot of grow facilities that, once it is open, it will last and it's gonna be once regulations come in we're gonna see a lot of current manufacturing that just won't do it.

Speaker 3: Well so, let me make sure I understand what you're saying. There are gonna be some businesses that don't make it despite what they do in terms of investment. So it might not be a good idea to get a G, ya know, up to that GMP certification if you're not gonna be a lucky one, type of thing.

Speaker 4: Absolutely. I mean, if you think about indoor grows, how many indoor grows are we gonna see in five years? It's gonna be hard.

Speaker 3: It's a tremendous amount of tomatoes that are grown indoors. I'm kidding with you. That's nuts, we grow our vegetables outside. Grow plants outside. That's where they grow.

Speaker 4: And I mean, think about it. Growing cannabis indoor in Arizona. What?

Speaker 3: What? So then, what we are talking about, forget about the grow, it is the manufacturing thing, right? Okay fine, so then maybe three million dollars is worth it.

Speaker 4: I think it would be very smart of companies to go and do the GMP certification right now because not many are going to be and that's going to set them apart and that's going to give them that edge to compete once regulations do come in.

Speaker 3: It's gonna be a differentiater.

Speaker 4: It will be.

Speaker 3: That's what it's gonna be. Part of their value proposition.

Speaker 4: Absolutely.

Speaker 3: To have a GMP certify.

Speaker 4: And then companies like mine will have to go and find three million dollars to redo it and it's going to take a lot of capital and a lot of resources and time. Which, in this industry, no one has.

Speaker 3: So lets continue that conversation. So you go find three million dollars, right? Then how much time does that take after the three million? After you've secured three million dollars. Seven figures.

Speaker 4: I would say it would take about a year, just because I saw what it took here. In Israel you have to work with a GMP consulting firm that will give you that stamp and they have to go step by step with you to approve every single room and what's in it. But that's, the consulting fee is a quarter of a million dollars right there.

Speaker 3: Just for them to give you their blessing, so to speak. This is almost like we're making the food kosher.

Speaker 4: Pretty much. But even more...

Speaker 3: Right, but the Rabbis aren't that expensive I don't think.

Speaker 4: That's even more expensive. And then, you know, you have to build clean rooms. It's very complicated.

Speaker 3: So if you were a person that did have a manufacturing facility, you would go ahead and, you know, you would convert that immediately if you could.

Speaker 4: You know the way I see it, I think I see this industry a little different probably than others...

Speaker 3: Well why would you say that? Because you're a woman and a CEO still into cannabis? And all of the, we used to be like, yeah 50% and now, what happened? The money. The money changed it.

Speaker 4: The money came in. Yeah, yeah. Women have more difficult times getting finance. I think the risk, I think women are not jumping into it like we see other executives will.

Speaker 3: What about the women that were here?

Speaker 4: They saw, and they never, I don't think they were in it for a long period of time of risking risking risking.

Speaker 3: To stay. I'll run my small business maybe with some of them.

Speaker 4: So, I've been in Arizona. I am the last company that is majority owned by a woman.

Speaker 3: Okay, so you see things differently. But you didn't mean it because of that.

Speaker 4: But I don't know, I don't think that's what it is. I think I see where it's going in terms of commodity.

Speaker 3: Yeah, the plant itself. 'Cause it's a plant.

Speaker 4: And how there isn't, there's going to be...

Speaker 3: This person has definite opinions about things. And so that is good to know because I tried to make sure that you couldn't hear what he said and I think he even pierced through. I'm loud.

Speaker 4: You are loud and he did better than you.

Speaker 3: And we're gonna, we're just leaving it in. 'Cause we're in Israel. And you just take it as it comes in Israel, right? You wake up to today, what's happening today? Who knows. You have a different point of view.

Speaker 4: Yeah so I do think that marijuana is a commodity and you have to start bringing yourself to be able to survive it. So if I look at that and I think what are we good at as a business? What is the one thing that we're good at, what's gonna make us jump out of bed in the morning? It's not doing the farm thing, it's not doing the processing thing. So let's get those big companies that do that...do that and sell bulk [inaudible 00:13:22] oil and we'll formulate it. So really scaling down what we do instead of doing everything and then really focusing on developing the formulations and branding.

Speaker 3: Pick a lane. Okay so you pick a lane and you're gonna decide to actually serve the patients?

Speaker 4: Yes.

Speaker 3: Right, yeah exactly. Here, these patients said they need our help. They don't need us in the grow. They need us to actually figure out exactly how to give them what they need.

Speaker 4: Right. Right that's what we see as what we're gonna be good at.

Speaker 3: So we're here in Canna tech and I asked the audience, how many of you are here for the patient? And I was ready for like, everybody to jump up and down and wave their hands and be like, me, me, me, me, me 100%.

Speaker 4: Yes definitely here.

Speaker 3: It wasn't.

Speaker 4: Was it 50?

Speaker 3: Lets just say it was over 50%. That's as good as I can say. Now, there are also people who don't wanna participate when somebody like me asks them to do something, right? So then okay fine, we'll give them 25 more percent. So that's only 75% though. We even a patient, Riley, she's beautiful, wonderful 13 year old. She really changed the legislation and after the thing I said alright, 'Now how many of you are here for the patient?' And it still wasn't 100%. What do you think about the fact that we started this conversation in 2013 whatever but you were before. When did you start?

Speaker 4: We started in 2011.

Speaker 3: Yeah, in 2011, now we're in 2019. In 2011 what percentage of people, do you think, were doing it for the patient? Be honest. Don't let me, ya know...

Speaker 4: In 2011 it was probably 80-90%.

Speaker 3: Okay, how many do you think, despite my numbers. Don't listen to me, don't let me kind of, shape your opinion.

Speaker 4: It flipped. Now it's 10-20.

Speaker 3: That's what you, Oh my god. Really? Oh no! So it's worse than what we saw, is what you're saying.

Speaker 4: Oh definitely in my market, yeah.

Speaker 3: In Arizona specifically.

Speaker 4: In Arizona, specific.

Speaker 3: What about generally? Is it better or worse?

Speaker 4: You know, I think it became like any other industry, right? It's a lot about the market and data and money instead of...this industry started with passion for people to change stigma, ya know, and help patients.

Speaker 3: That's what I'm talking about.

Speaker 4: It's not it anymore.

Speaker 3: I still am talking about that. When I speak to folks that maybe not are not new in the space but it's necessarily the top of their list. It does...everybody does know to speak to it at least, I guess. And so, it is up to, I think, regulators to regulate that but then I get...I have Dana Rohrabacher and Tom Mcclintock, Don Young and Matt Gates and even David Joyce...these are congressmen. Corey Gardner, senator, that I've spoken to, Thomas Massie. I can speak the language, I get it, I understand, ya know. Don't regulate, right? We don't need regulations. The market will figure it out. But I also think maybe sometimes the market doesn't figure it out.

Speaker 4: The market doesn't. And I think, you know, it's hard 'cause I do think there is a place for pharmaceutical, for companies that will do clinical studies, like they do here and will figure out how to take this plant and create a medicine for various psych patient. And there is space for that and that's gonna be one market. And then there's going to be the ones that are like food supplement, vitamin world, that will figure out wellness. So people with social anxiety, like you, clearly.

Speaker 3: That was well played.

Speaker 4: Funny. We'll use that. And then there's going to be complete fun, recreational users. So it's going to split into three. Now in terms of regulations, you know, if you eat at a cheap restaurant or a fancy restaurant it should still be able to pass the same health department regulations. I'm expecting the same when I'm gonna consume cannabis.

Speaker 3: I know but I think that what might I hear what you're saying, and it's obviously cogent advice and it's an outlook that will absolutely, it seems like, come true. So thank you for sharing that, it's just depressing that we're not all kind of like, gung ho, 'Isn't this great, this plant is different, and we can actually help people,' and you know, tear drops and hug the tree. Ya know what I'm saying? It just ain't happening I guess.

Speaker 4: Its different, right? When money comes in industries change so there's different people in it and there's different results that people are expecting.

Speaker 3: Yeah different results, people, yeah.

Speaker 4: Investors are looking for different results than just, 'look at this life we just changed.'

Speaker 3: Yeah, Alright. Because we can change lives through creation of wealth and so that's how we come at it from that point of view and I understand, I get it. Anyway, how are you, as a person...as a human being?

Speaker 4: Doing great. I mean, finally we have the sun.

Speaker 3: We have the sun in Israel.

Speaker 4: I can't believe that it's April and raining. What is happening?

Speaker 3: It was raining and cold. I got out of the airport, I literally, I thought I was in New Jersey. Like what the heck was going on?

Speaker 4: [inaudible 00:18:59], windy. It was very confused but this is beautiful and I think that conference is great.

Speaker 3: Yeah, sure of course, always.

Speaker 4: And Arizona market is great, it's definitely different than what it was three months ago or six months ago or a year ago or when we first spoke. But I think thats...you gotta love it, right? It's what makes it interesting.

Speaker 3: Ya know the states act is gonna pass any minute.

Speaker 4: Yes I know.

Speaker 3: Do you think that?

Speaker 4: I think not any minute but I do think it's gonna happen.

Speaker 3: When do you think it's gonna happen?

Speaker 4: My prediction...2 years.

Speaker 3: Meaning...podcast land knows no time. We happen to be talking at the now very beginning of que 2, 2019. So what are we saying?

Speaker 4: Oo. You're planning it. Okay, I'm gonna say the beginning of 2021.

Speaker 3: Okay and that's the states passing? I am going to beat you to the punch and I'll tell you why. It definitely not in 2019. Now here we go, it's 2020, so presidential election year. Senators need to get reelected, okay? And so right there you got cannabis as an issue. So who owns it? Whoever passes it.

Speaker 4: That's very true.

Speaker 3: There we go.

Speaker 4: So you think, like mid 2020.

Speaker 3: Oh yeah, I would be surprised if it doesn't pass in mid 2020 and you know what it doesn't do? Really? Anything? Here's the reason why. It does take it off of the schedule for, ya know, it does take it out of the controlled substances act of 1970. Can't name check that one enough but it still is different law across the nation and so what do the banks do? Because, you know that [inaudible 00:20:59]. The department of the treasury still has guidance that says bankers can bank. So it is kind of federally legal as opposed to generally federally legal. I think that that's a difference. But I'm not a banker.

Speaker 4: The banking situation, well hopefully they're doing a little bit of something now.

Speaker 3: No they are doing a little bit of something, what I'm saying is the states act still makes it so that some states this, and some states that.

Speaker 4: But isn't that what happened with alcohol? That's how the change starts.

Speaker 3: Yes, yes. Banks are a different size now then they were then. That's number one.

Speaker 4: That's true but also the Canadian stock market.

Speaker 3: Also the Canadian stock market, what? Is where cannabis companies are traded?

Speaker 4: Yes. Yeah.

Speaker 3: So what are we saying, that the US has to keep up? No that's...what were you saying?

Speaker 4: What? That would be nice if the US would actually look and say, 'Okay now we need to have a discussion and we do need banking.'

Speaker 3: So you are bringing up the Canadian stock market to say, 'Hey look see all the money is going over there.' That's what you're saying.

Speaker 4: Of course, yes.

Speaker 3: Okay great, yeah. That's been happening for a while now.

Speaker 4: A while now. Keep happening.

Speaker 3: Yeah, 2019, no state act. So we agree on that?

Speaker 4: We do agree on that.

Speaker 3: You think not even 2020?

Speaker 4: It's hard for me to see it happening so quick but I do see your point about the election.

Speaker 3: Yeah, so we usually don't do prognostications but when I'm speaking to a friend, you know what I mean, I give myself that power. At least...

Speaker 4: It's gonna be interesting.

Speaker 3: At least one Lilac Power pun per interview. And that was the one. Alright, so three final questions for returning guests. I'll tell you what they are then I'll ask you them in order. What would you change about yourself, if anything? What would you change about anything else, if you could? And on the soundtrack of your life, one song that's gotta be on there, that's always the last question. What would you change about yourself, if anything, might be something you're already working on.

Speaker 4: You know, I have been trying to work on my feedback muscle.

Speaker 3: What does that mean?

Speaker 4: So, I have noticed that, believe it or not, I have kind of a strong personalities.

Speaker 3: You do? I would not have known.

Speaker 4: But that makes people not give me feedback. And I think it's the way I react or just my personality that makes them not give it to me but I always want to improve so I'm trying to make conscious understanding of that and letting people know that. So hopefully they will approach me for that.

Speaker 3: Yeah, here's what's interesting. I also have been told, that I have a stronger personality.

Speaker 4: That is shocking.

Speaker 3: Yeah, however, folks are very happy to give me feedback. So I wonder, there's, we should continue this discussion after and see what you're doing or what I'm not doing, or whatever.

Speaker 4: We should probably combine it here.

Speaker 3: Yeah, some of it might have something to do, societally, we deal with old people, both of us...with the fact that we look different. That might be something again, with the older people, not necessarily with the younger people. You get my drift there?

Speaker 4: I do, yeah. It could be.

Speaker 3: I do seriously think that the boomer generation, Generation X, that's you and me, unless you're a millennial. Whatever you identify as, and Millennials...those are three different generations with absolutely three different outlooks.

Speaker 4: Yeah but I have employees of every generation and I don't...I would love more feedback.

Speaker 3: No matter the generation.

Speaker 4: No matter the generation.

Speaker 3: Okay, fantastic. So feedback. You wanna improve your feedback muscle, which is intended with mine, which is I have to get to the gym, ever. That's my goal.

Speaker 4: That's a good goal.

Speaker 3: Yeah. And then continue to go. Once I get there, now keep going. What would you change about anything else if you could? Could be anything, go as wide as you like or as narrow. It's up to you. 'Cause I saw in your eyes you were like, 'Wow should I do the big one?'

Speaker 4: That is, yeah, that's like is like world peace? No more children starving

Speaker 3: You could do world peace. Sure, yeah, those are good ones.

Speaker 4: I mean, if you ask me one thing, it would probably be, yeah.

Speaker 3: I think children starving is more attainable. Like world peace...

Speaker 4: Ya know what, I agree. Every time I see and read about children dying from starvation, I'm like...I can not believe that this is still happening.

Speaker 3: How are we letting this happen, exactly. So that one, I think 'cause everybody...It's like, who's against the kids here? Who wants to continue to see the kids die? Whereas, but the world peace thing is like very different if you talk to anybody anywhere including here of course, everybody's got their own opinion but I mean, the kids dying, lets try to stop that. So then we're going to anti children starvation...we're starting the effort here. Both of us are anti, right? Got a coalition of two so far. Just like Alice's restaurant. Listen to it, it takes 20 minutes but whatever. That's a reference and that will be my song, Alice's restaurant, for this conversation. It's, so it's like a 20 minute song about, essentially, his [inaudible 00:26:21] his son, he visits his friend Alice and it's a song about her restaurant but it has nothing to do with the restaurant because basically he litters and then he gets kind of caught up in the legal infrastructure of the United States of America during the Vietnam war. And so the rest of the story ensues.
You really have to hear it for yourself. But what is your song on the soundtrack of your life, ya know, if there is one track, one song that's gotta be on there, it might be something you gave us before, might not. Something off of [inaudible 00:26:55] computer.

Speaker 4: I don't know what is the name of the band or the song but do you know the song that is, 'I Don't Belong Here?'

Speaker 3: No, maybe I should.

Speaker 4: Creep? Is it Creep?

Speaker 3: Oh I don't belong here, Yeah. No, that's yeah, It is creep, and it is Radiohead. And that did happen when I was in college. Exactly. But you do belong here. What the hell was that?

Speaker 4: Come on. This is the English radio. How many times you feel belong and don't belong in the same 5 minutes.

Speaker 3: Yes I take your point. Well just, yeah and we have to have a better sense of belongings, we'll kind of bring that together and wrap it up.

Speaker 4: A little kumbaya next time.

Speaker 3: Exactly. Lilac Power, you never cease to amaze me or impress me, it is a pleasure to be your friend. Or I should say, It is my pleasure you are my friend is what I can say. I can't assume that I'm your friend.

Speaker 4: You are my friend.

Speaker 3: There we go now we got it recorded so you can't [inaudible 00:28:01]. We'll check in with you down the line.

Speaker 4: Absolutely thank you.

Speaker 3: And there you have Lilac Power very much appreciate her time very appreciate your time. Stay tuned.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.