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Episode #141 – Shelley Schneider, Medicine Man

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Episode #141 - Shelley Schneider, Medicine Man

Episode #141 – Shelley Schneider, Medicine Man

Shelley joins her siblings – Sally, Episode 10, Andy, Episode
27 and Pete Episode 68 as a guest.  The four siblings who run
Medicine Man are an interesting bunch.  So much so that we’re
in the process of filming a 12 part documentary on the family and
the business called- you guessed it- Family, Business.
Yesterday we put the first three parts of that documentary
up- search for it on youtube with the handle canneconomy. If you’ve
heard each of the sibling’s episodes, you know that this is a
family that didn’t have it easy growing up.  They took lessons
from their mother of learning to fail, not quitting and hustling
and put those lessons to work at Medicine Man.  Shelley shares
a couple of those lessons.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Shelly schneider of Medicine Man, Shelly joins her siblings. Sally, episode 10, Andy, episode 27 and Pete episode 68 as a guest walk into cannabis economy. I'm your host, Seth Adler. The four siblings who run medicine man are an interesting bunch, so much so that we're in the process of filming a documentary on the family and the business called, you guessed it, family business yesterday. We put the first three parts of that documentary up, search for it on youtube with the handle can economy. That's two ends in the word economy. If you've heard each of the siblings episodes, you know that this is a family that didn't have it easy growing up. They took lessons from their mother of learning to fail, not quitting and hustling and put those lessons to work at medicine. Man, here's shelly on a couple of those lessons.

Speaker 2: I'm ready. Ready? You're ready? I'm ready. Let's go. We're in the house of Schneider. Is that fair? Yes. I mean, this is your house. This is the Schneider's house. Your Sheldon Schneider. You are the sibling of Andy Pete Williams and Sally Vanderveer. Yes, I am. You have this very special family. These are all unique people that we've spoken to. You are the final sibling that we have not spoken to just yet. And you're the baby. You're the youngest. Do you play that card, do you think? With them?

Speaker 3: I, I guess

Speaker 2: so with my mom. Because your mom siblings, but the siblings, are they nicer to you than they are to each other?

Speaker 3: I think they see each other a little bit more than they see me. And so maybe they get on each other's nerves a little bit more than then I get on their nerves. But when I did work with Sally, I think, I think I

Speaker 2: got on her nerves a little bit, a little bit more than, well, a little bit. We can go into that. So the, you're, you're on a little bit of a hiatus is what I'm going to call it. Um, and we're going to get into everything about what's happening now, but we need to kind of go all the way back, you know, because we've gotten this history and you have this beautiful house by the way that is up on this hill where you can see the mountains behind. It's ridiculous. It's an open plan house. So there's a little bit of an echo. Yes. Yeah. So we have spoken with them about their history and your history and you're the nice one is what it is. So you're saying that you used to get on, on Sally's nerves, but as the nice one, is that fair or no? You, you're pushing back on this year. The nice one.

Speaker 3: Yeah. Nice. As in I'm going to say what needs to be said in a nice. I'll try to say it in the nicest way possible. Um, without hurting people's feelings. But I, I'm not so nice when something needs to be said. Is it done?

Speaker 2: You're pleasant. You're not necessarily nicer. Pleasant. Maybe that's another way to say it. That's another way to say it. So you get that from your mother?

Speaker 3: I do. She has. Everybody's best interest at heart and I tried to be like my mother.

Speaker 2: Right, and each of the siblings, do they have each mentioned that they try to be like your mother? She's the best. Everybody thinks that. I think that too. I've met her a couple times, Michelle, but I call her mom just like you guys, what he does. Exactly. All right, so we're. Where do you remember, because this family was all over the place. California, Japan. We had would be island for a little bit. We had upstate New York. Where do you pick up memory?

Speaker 3: Well, my earliest memory is in New York on Lake Erie, playing with the hard slate. Black Rock's. That's my earliest memory and writing down dear street on a bicycle when I was three, and then I remember picking up all four of us in station wagon, taking a trip to California from New York to California with the German shepherd in the car.

Speaker 1: Shelly schneider of Medicine Man, Shelly joins her siblings. Sally, episode 10, Andy, episode 27 and Pete episode 68 as a guest walk into cannabis economy. I'm your host, Seth Adler. The four siblings who run medicine man are an interesting bunch, so much so that we're in the process of filming a documentary on the family and the business called, you guessed it, family business yesterday. We put the first three parts of that documentary up, search for it on youtube with the handle can economy. That's two ends in the word economy. If you've heard each of the siblings episodes, you know that this is a family that didn't have it easy growing up. They took lessons from their mother of learning to fail, not quitting and hustling and put those lessons to work at medicine. Man, here's shelly on a couple of those lessons.

Speaker 2: I'm ready. Ready? You're ready? I'm ready. Let's go. We're in the house of Schneider. Is that fair? Yes. I mean, this is your house. This is the Schneider's house. Your Sheldon Schneider. You are the sibling of Andy Pete Williams and Sally Vanderveer. Yes, I am. You have this very special family. These are all unique people that we've spoken to. You are the final sibling that we have not spoken to just yet. And you're the baby. You're the youngest. Do you play that card, do you think? With them?

Speaker 3: I, I guess

Speaker 2: so with my mom. Because your mom siblings, but the siblings, are they nicer to you than they are to each other?

Speaker 3: I think they see each other a little bit more than they see me. And so maybe they get on each other's nerves a little bit more than then I get on their nerves. But when I did work with Sally, I think, I think I

Speaker 2: got on her nerves a little bit, a little bit more than, well, a little bit. We can go into that. So the, you're, you're on a little bit of a hiatus is what I'm going to call it. Um, and we're going to get into everything about what's happening now, but we need to kind of go all the way back, you know, because we've gotten this history and you have this beautiful house by the way that is up on this hill where you can see the mountains behind. It's ridiculous. It's an open plan house. So there's a little bit of an echo. Yes. Yeah. So we have spoken with them about their history and your history and you're the nice one is what it is. So you're saying that you used to get on, on Sally's nerves, but as the nice one, is that fair or no? You, you're pushing back on this year. The nice one.

Speaker 3: Yeah. Nice. As in I'm going to say what needs to be said in a nice. I'll try to say it in the nicest way possible. Um, without hurting people's feelings. But I, I'm not so nice when something needs to be said. Is it done?

Speaker 2: You're pleasant. You're not necessarily nicer. Pleasant. Maybe that's another way to say it. That's another way to say it. So you get that from your mother?

Speaker 3: I do. She has. Everybody's best interest at heart and I tried to be like my mother.

Speaker 2: Right, and each of the siblings, do they have each mentioned that they try to be like your mother? She's the best. Everybody thinks that. I think that too. I've met her a couple times, Michelle, but I call her mom just like you guys, what he does. Exactly. All right, so we're. Where do you remember, because this family was all over the place. California, Japan. We had would be island for a little bit. We had upstate New York. Where do you pick up memory?

Speaker 3: Well, my earliest memory is in New York on Lake Erie, playing with the hard slate. Black Rock's. That's my earliest memory and writing down dear street on a bicycle when I was three, and then I remember picking up all four of us in station wagon, taking a trip to California from New York to California with the German shepherd in the car.

Speaker 2: What's the name of the German shepherd? Laddie. Laddie. Laddies in the car. The three other siblings are in the car. How old are you at the time for four. So four years old. And so you have early memories, you remember driving down with the tricycle. You're three years old. Were you chasing them? No, I was just, just own your second. I was alone on your bicycle. Find your way. I think a riding up and down. A couple of couple of your siblings have said you were able to find your own way. You had the freedom to fail. We did. All right. So you get in the car and so your four. Right. And everybody's kind of like eight, 10, 12, whatever. And so then now we're going to drive to California. Do you think that you realized what was happening as you set out on the journey?

Speaker 3: I don't, I don't think I realized that. Um, I remember it being fun. I remember camping, stopped and camped and I got to see fireflies. I think that was the only time I ever saw fireflies in my life. Um, so camping and I just remember being fun. I don't remember any chaos or this was a blast. It was a blast.

Speaker 2: What do you think that your siblings also were having? Fun?

Speaker 3: No, I think I was just too young to know what was going on and I, my mom did a good job at

Speaker 2: faking it a little bit. What were, what were your siblings thinking and saying and doing?

Speaker 3: Oh, I'm sure they were fighting and kicking each other with their feet and saying, yeah, that's my space. We always did that. We did that too. Just like normal kids.

Speaker 2: So Sally was always in charge right now. Would she ever fight with Andy directly?

Speaker 3: Not, no. So it was always andy and pete just going at each other and in Pico and had each other. Right. Did they ever pick on you? Peter and I? A little bit, yes. Yes. I remember I kicked Peter in the nuts one time and he pushed me so. Right, well that's, I mean, you, you did it first, right? I mean, so yeah, we did, we fought. That was, that was a bad one. That was one of the worst, but we fought.

Speaker 2: Okay. You, you get to California, do you remember California? What do you mean?

Speaker 3: Oh yes. I remember we lived in a few places we lived in, um,

Speaker 3: and ocean side California, Huntington beach. That was the most beautiful place, um, paddle boats and just the best place to, to live for a kid, you can walk to the park and walk to the library and walk to the lake. And so I remember California, it was just a few years that we lived there. I remember we, there was, I don't know what house it was, but there was some big hills in our backyard and my brothers and I would always go play in the, in the hills and see the nature and lots of hawks and trane chillers. And I remember Peter and Andy bringing home trenchless. Yeah.

Speaker 2: Very believable. And did you name the trenches? How did we spend time with the torrential? It's in a jar. The trench, there wasn't, I don't recall what happened to the tarantula. Right. But you remember seeing it. Were you struck by it? I would imagine so. You remember it now

Speaker 3: I'm not, I'm not afraid of spiders and things like that. Although I was afraid of grasshoppers. That's the one thing that I was afraid of, grasshoppers and Peter, it was just the torture from Peter. He made me be afraid of grasshopper. Right.

Speaker 2: On purpose, on purpose. I was just, I feel I've realized I was projecting my fear of Tarantulas. Oh my assumed fear because I don't think I've come in contact with one, but I don't want to write. But grasshoppers. I'm okay with. I've been, I've been in contact with grasshoppers. They're fine. So you're, you're in California for just a couple of years and do you know what that beeping is? That happens? That's probably something I forgot I was cooking. Oh, okay. Alright. I think someone's dealing with that now. That's fantastic. Um, so, uh, so and when we're just coming off of dinner. Thank you so much. So, uh, so you got the tarantula is you got the, uh, you got the California, eventually you get in the car again and you go to Colorado because I know everybody went to high school in Colorado and so do you remember that trip? Yeah,

Speaker 3: I think we flew to Colorado this time. I think we actually, I think we went to visit Andy's and Peter's and sally's father while mom was making the moves and their father Tom always treated me like I was one of them and so I went with them when they went to visit their father

Speaker 2: beyond. Right. Okay. So you go up there, Tom, treat you just like one of the siblings. Um, let's, I guess get into the fact that, uh, you've got a different father. Yeah. Do you uh, how much time do you remember your dad I'm spending with your mom?

Speaker 3: Like how much? Not much. I know it wasn't in the thing. They separated when I was very little, just a year older, but he kept that relationship with him. I did. I would travel back to New York to see my father every year or two and I would travel by myself from the time I was five. From the time you were fired when I was five, I would go all the way to Buffalo, New York, stop in Chicago along the way. And there I am running down the, in the airport with the stewardess. We would call them back

Speaker 2: then attendance. That is what they were called then. That's what they were called. That truly accurate at the time? Yes. Yes. You're not offending any.

Speaker 3: Is that A. Yeah, I'm a flight attendant stewardess. The flight attendant running down the airport hallway so I wouldn't catch my next flight and that's what what I did when I was young so I could go see my father.

Speaker 2: All right. So you remember that and your siblings were not on this trip with you, so you're coming from being the baby, being the youngest, kind of trailing along with your tribe, icicle in this ridiculously chaotic house, and then all of a sudden you're alone flying and running through airports. Do you remember the different mindset?

Speaker 3: It's a lot to ask of a five year old. Oh yes. I was so happy to see my dad, but right away I was ready to go home because I missed. I missed my family. Boring, right? Because there's no other kids around. There was a kid across the street, but if you know, I just miss my mom. I miss my mom and Colorado and you know, every time and I still do now when I fly away and then I fly back to Colorado. There's something about seeing the mountains that feels like home to me. And so every time I come back to Colorado and I see those mountains, it's just home.

Speaker 2: You're like your back. That's the same feeling that I get when I fly over the city of New York now back. Alright fine. So that was a trip. Whatever I want, wherever I was, fine a bag. Right? I know exactly the feeling you're talking about,

Speaker 3: but I loved going to visit my father but was always homesick every time.

Speaker 2: Right. So then you, uh, you, you kind of find your rhythm here in Colorado now, you know, I would imagine the kids start to siphon off because sally goes to high and he goes to high school and then back to whidbey island. We heard that story. Pete goes to high school and then eventually you're just alone with mom, right? At a certain point are now poor mom alone. Right.

Speaker 3: Driving her crazy. And how would you drive her crazy? Oh, well, not tell her where I am and not

Speaker 2: come home. If I were a bad girl, bad girl. How old would your teenage years?

Speaker 3: Uh, I would say how, how, when did, when did I start being terrible teenager? Early 13. Oh. So like right away. And I didn't stop being a terrible teenager until I became a mother. I think that changed me.

Speaker 2: Okay. And you became a mother yet, but between 13 and 20 we've got to cover these years. Why? Why do you think it was? What? Do you remember what you were rebelling against? Do you remember why you were behaving that way? I think honestly,

Speaker 3: I'm just a very hard learner and I was following the crowd. I would get mixed up with the wrong people and didn't know what else to do. And so I went with what they did and that wasn't, I should have. I'm a strong person and I'm a leader and I was not being myself. I was just, I'm totally different person. I've learned so much. When did you realize that you were a strong person? Good question. Uh,

Speaker 2: cause you said it very matter of fact, I said when I became a mother. So then a lot of that is wrapped into this, what Sally has spoken about, the fact that she tried to keep everybody kind of acting well. Do you remember her kind of giving you advice at that time in your life? Absolutely. What was she saying?

Speaker 3: Absolutely. I would go, sally had just got married and I would go and stay with her and her husband when I was sad or I needed help and she was always there for me. She was, she was my second mom. She was my rock. She would take me by me, take me shopping and buy me clothes. Not that my mom didn't, she I got, you know, had everything I wanted. Um, but sally balmy extra stuff, real special things that I don't know if every sister does that. She really took care of me.

Speaker 2: It sounds like it was more than just a shirt. It was the, the, that excursion, you know, let's go out and do this. Whatever it is was she took me to my first concert, which was Rick Springfield. He was so, he was so high he was, I got my haircut exactly like him. He was so wait, wait a second. You got your haircut like Rick Springfield? Yes. Not like the girl in the video or whatever. Like him. Like why would you do that? That was the style. You know the bullet? Yeah. Even for he was a dude. You didn't care. No, he was that. Huh? Is that cool? Alright. So Rick Springfield. Where was it? A red rocks. Don't say red rocks right here in boulder. And there you go. Okay. So that's your first concert. Shelly brings you the. Shelly. Sally brings you there. Uh, you know, you're, you're misbehaving as a teenager, right? And compare to her. No, no, no, we don't. We don't look to better. No one can compare to sally. What are we talking about right now? One Gan class president. Prom Queen. The whole thing. Exactly. So now where did you grow up? Did you graduate high school? I should ask.

Speaker 3: No, I didn't go. I'll tell you what. Let's do. Let's talk about it. Yes. In 1988. 80 seven. Sure. If you're 16, you could walk into school and say, I'm done. I, I signed it, I signed myself out, and that's what I did. Side yourself, signed myself out, and they didn't say, what can we do to keep you here? Right. They didn't say anything. I just signed my name and they said, okay, call my mom. They didn't even call her. Did she? Did she? No, no, you did. You did this without her. Now I did. And I said, I came home. She came home from work and I said, mom, guess what? Dropped out of school today. What did she say? And I knew that she. She said, if any of you kids ever drop out of school, you're going to have to get a job and just be an adult even have to live, you know, a responsible adult life, then you're going to see that it's hard. So I said, okay, mom, I'm going to get a job. That's what I want to do. That's what I'm going to do.

Speaker 2: Right. Did she call you a quitter? Because she called the a quitter and he literally never forgot it.

Speaker 3: Oh yes, yes. She calls her don't quit. Right. That's not what we don't. And if you do, you're going to start something else. Yes. You better finish it before you started. Who Don't quit, so what job did you get? I went up to keystone and I was only 16 in the mountains. I don't know how this happened, but I got a job at keystone and lived in the housing that they supply you with. I think I had a fake birth certificate. Oh my God. So I went up to keystone. Right. So I said, mom and Richard, my stepfather, I'm quitting school and I'm moving up to keystone keystone with three boys and they were all teenagers as well, and it's, it's amazing that my, my stepfather, he said, okay, shelly, right. He was devastated. He said, okay, pack your bags and I'll take you. That's what he said. What did your mother say? She was probably freaking out. I, I don't think she knew how to handle it. I, I. It's a good thing that she had Richard on her path. She needs to obviously. So Richard, I mean if it was me, I don't know what I would do either with my. One of my daughters told me that, so Richard dealt with me and he, what's the dog's name? We got to say it, jewel, jewel.

Speaker 3: And so he drove me up there and he knew I would be calling. Of course. I called three weeks later and said, I can't do it. Please come pick me up. I miss you. I'll go back to school. And so he got me. We went and he signed me up for this school called adult high, which was the coolest school ever. It sounds like it's an movie. It doesn't sound like a real thing. So cool. It's real. What isn't, what is that? It's a school for kids that drop out and want to go back to school. So they call you an adult then I guess. Well they give you the respect of like, all right, come on back, you're an adult. Let's just do this. Different is unfair. Is that how it was? That's how it was. And they do it different. They don't give you homework different.

Speaker 3: We're just going to do all the work here. That's what they do. You'd be amazed how much you actually learn when you know that you're not going to have to go home, take it home. And so all of us, I remember learning more at that school than I ever had because I think the teachers were just so chill. It was a different environment, different vibe. What does, uh, what, what interested you specifically? You said you were obviously you're taking in education and in a different way. What, what was, uh, what were the subjects that were like, I like philosophy, very cool. Philosophy and adult high. You don't get that in regular. Oh No, I'm sorry. It was psychology. Philosophy. Psychology is my daughter's into philosophy, but psychology. Got It. Really cool. So here's where we start with the kind of patient kind of thing of, of psychiatry.

Speaker 3: And so did you graduate from adult? I, I did. Congratulations. Thank you. And then what happened? Well, during what I went to the school, we did these tests and they would show you what you would be best at doing. And it came back that I was, would be best at doing childcare and I always loved children and I actually, I had that in my heart ever since I was a teenager already. I loved kids. And so that's where a bad teenager, even when I was a bad teenager, hood shelley was in. I love kids so much. So that's what I did. I worked in a daycare center and then I thought, wait a minute, I can make so much more money if I do this on my own, if I run the daycare, if I run the daycare. Absolutely daycare. Absolutely. What was the name of the daycare? Happy home learning zone. That's pretty great and adorable. Thank you. Alright. So then how did you get clientele, shelly? Oh Gosh. In the beginning. The good old fashioned newspaper. And then word of mouth, it happens very quickly. And when you're licensed, you know, they people call up the state of Colorado and say who's licensed?

Speaker 2: So how old are you? Nineteen at the time now, right?

Speaker 3: I, when I started doing childcare, I was 23.

Speaker 2: Alright. So we skipped a step. Okay. Because children came in before that. Oh, oh yeah. Yeah. So you have how many children at four and three of them are yours. Is that how it is? And we'll get into the brady bunch situation. Sure, sure. But, uh, when you, because you mentioned the fact that essentially you became an adult, you became responsible, you found yourself, you, you're a strong person. You, all of this came wrapped in the bowl of becoming a mother. So after trials, after trials of

Speaker 3: have I no longer spirit experimenting with a job that didn't really suit me, but before, so not the daycare stuff. Before the daycare, it was before the daycares for the daycare. I was a stripper.

Speaker 2: Oh my God. Really? Oh, for real. I was. Oh my God.

Speaker 3: No secret. What? Secret secret. It's no secret. Everybody knows. Everybody knows. Now I know this. Everybody knows. What was that like? What's that? I don't even know. I can't relate to that in any way. What is that? It? It was fun, but too much fun. Fun at first. It's exciting and you know, you get a lot of money. It's very easy. It's a little bit glamorous, but it gets old real fast and you have to, you have to intoxicate yourself with something in order to do it because you get feeling really terrible about, about what you're doing and for living and you know,

Speaker 2: that's good. There's a high that goes all the way up high, that goes all the way in and then all of a sudden there's a realization come all the way back. Absolutely.

Speaker 3: And that's how those girls, I believe, get through that with drugs.

Speaker 2: Okay. All right. So we needed to find an outlet that was different than that. So then I got, I got pregnant

Speaker 3: and I still did for a little while. I went back and kind of show I, well after I had the baby, I, I did go back at it for a little while. Um, but it wasn't working out for me because you had changed. I had changed was it was just like I was being pulled in two different places and I couldn't do it anymore. I just said I'm not doing it. And that's when I started childcare. Crazy. Right. I didn't tell any of my parents what I had and they now know though, now they do. Right before you said it

Speaker 2: now is what I'm saying. When, when did you shoot? So you have the kid and you're like, wait, when did you kind of share that moment in your life with everybody? It sounds like you initially didn't and then eventually you.

Speaker 3: I told my mom right away, tell family knew. Right. And what did she say? Oh, she just prayed for me. She literally, literally, and the whole church, the entire church. Everybody praying for me constantly. Nonstop. I really needed.

Speaker 2: And they came through

Speaker 3: 40 and then they came through for me. I, because you now are a religious person yourself very much. When did you find that? When did you find the religion? Through those hard times? Um, I was, I was in my early twenties, maybe about 22 and um, it was just the, the lowest part of my, of my, one of my life, you know, doing drugs and I won't say who, but you know, my ex husband, um, you know, he's changed now too by the way, but he was as well and it was a really bad situation and that was, mom showed me that there was a god that loved us and that life could be different. And so I went in that direction instead and I called upon God for pretty much everything. He was my mechanic. Now my father, he was just there for me and that got me through the hard times and the change in my life and who I was going to be.

Speaker 2: I don't, I'm not trying to make a joke. You God was your mechanic? Yes. How does that work? Because I don't.

Speaker 3: It works when you're sitting in your car and it doesn't start and you don't have a man around because you're single and you don't know what to do and you say, God, can you please fix my car? I know you're the best mechanic ever and he makes it start. Wow. That's literally miraculous. It is. Or when you're driving your car with your daughter and it's an icy road and your car stops in the middle of the hill and you, you're stuck and you're going backwards and, and, and you pray and you get up the hill, you start going up the hill of all of a sudden that, that's another type of mechanic. There we go. Alright. So,

Speaker 2: so I mean it's just, it's the one thing over from carpenter kind of makes sense. Right? So, all right, so, uh, we have daughter number one's name is jj. And so she's two years old when you have daughter number two, am I right? Am I doing three years old? Three years old. And here comes started number two. Who? Lilly? Lilly. Alright. So they're three years apart. And so now you have two babies, right? Basically. Yeah. And so now here's shelly brand new shelly, right? She's driving her car. Everything's fine. Garments or mechanic. She's doing daycare, running my everything. I've got my two

Speaker 3: kids

Speaker 2: literally night and day one 81 80, and so that's mom and that's family and that's, you know, your relationship with religion, right? And then you do your two beautiful daughters. Right. Okay. So here they are and they're running around and you're doing your daycare thing and this is a while ago, right? Because jade is how old now? So this is about 20 years ago. Right? And so, um, when was the next step, you know, if we had solved problem number one, which is shelly's bad girl. Now Shell is a good girl, right? So what's the next step? Because you did keep the daycare thing for awhile, right? I did. Just up until a year ago. All right. So you did that for 20 years. Okay. And so you had gotten a divorce because that wasn't working out. And then when, when did we meet this other guy? Like this guy. Oh, we like this guy, this guy's good, this guy's perfect. Did you see? The Blue Eyes is amazing. It's amazing. Tyler's eyes are beautiful.

Speaker 3: They are, but blue wasn't my favorite color then. So it wasn't his eyes. What was his magic hands? He can do anything with his hands. He can make anything. He can fix anything. It's absolutely amazing. He's my mechanic now. He's your dad is still my mechanic, but he's right there. Hands on.

Speaker 2: There we go. Right hand, man. He's God's right hand man. So, uh, and he's a sweetheart. He is. So how did you meet Tyler? Through Peter. Okay. Right. So Tyler told us this, right? That he was hanging out with Pete. Right. And then he told me like, I would like to date her sister. And so usually the answer was no there. Is that right? Yes. Right. Yes.

Speaker 3: No Way. It was no way. She has kids. She has two kids. Tyler, are you crazy? As a matter of fact, I called up Peter saying, could you please give tyler my phone number? He said, no, he doesn't want your phone.

Speaker 2: So No. So tyler wants to go out with shelly. Shelly wants to go out with Tyler and pizza in the middle being like, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no.

Speaker 3: Tyler doesn't want to kids jelly. No, he's got one on the way already, which so, so here we are now here we are two to number three, child number three, the Brady bunch thing. So I meet Tyler, we fall in love like love at first sight pretty much and he's gonna have a baby. It's not meant to be that way. And so he, we met in in January, January ninth, which is our anniversary and he had a baby in which is Taylor and in June. And so he assured me he was just going to have a baby. He was going to the hospital to have a baby and nothing else. And so then we had Taylor coming to visit us right from the beginning. She was a newborn, right. Every other weekend.

Speaker 2: He, he didn't have Taylor, right? We don't, I'm just saying that it had to be someone else involved. Oh yeah. Oh yes, yes. I just want to make sure the math adds up here. All right, so now Taylor, mother, she's a wonderful mother. So Tyler's visiting the tailor and the Jane and Lily are here and then now it's starting to feel like a little familial. Is that about right? Like everybody's kind of playing together and liking each other. Okay. And we've got Tyler Taylor, I've got dot Lilly, we've got shelly. And then there's one more. Right? When, when did we realize that tyler was going to be. When did we go ahead and do this?

Speaker 3: Well, we were right after we got married, we decided to marry pretty quickly. That's what I'm asking. That was my question. And then I don't want to marry on my birthday. My birthday, which was only six months after we met it was the best birthday ever. And um, then we married another six months after that. So we only knew each other for about a year before you're married or not knew each other, but dated for a year before we got married.

Speaker 2: And the Noah, right or melon and then. No, right away. Alright. So now everything's perfect. We got the fairness, got the right guy, we got all everything, spray daycares going good. Nothing, no problem there. And then all of a sudden somebody calls somebody a at medicine man and all of a sudden shelly's maybe gonna be a part of this. What happened?

Speaker 3: Well, they offered me to go in right from the beginning and I said no, I was really into the daycare thing and I didn't want to change. And. But after years and years of potty training and it gets a little bit. Oh. Then preschool and it just, it was time for change. And so all I had to do was call up sally and say I'm ready. Right. Isn't that nice? That is nice. I'm very, very blessed to be able to do that. There's not a lot of people that can get in to a business like this without knowing what I'm wondering.

Speaker 2: So you walk in a good job, you're a bud tender right away because you don't have the psychology in the background there you have the daycare thing so you can relate to people, you can talk to people. And how quickly did you realize that this was the right job for you at the time?

Speaker 3: Right away. I just loved it. I didn't ever. I didn't ever think, oh, I go into work, oh I have to get up and go to work. I was smiling, going to work and happy to be there and just standing there all day in front of people that need help and wondering, you know, what's the right strain for them or how can they relieve their pain? Or actually even on the recreational side, I feel the same way. Everybody just wants to feel better. And so I look at it like that.

Speaker 2: Yeah. And that is. I mean,

Speaker 3: Steve de Angelo wrote a book about that. So yeah, no, there is that. You're mostly on the medical side by the way, as I've noticed. Right. And let's go through a few different types of patients. No, you know, not, not names but, but specific types of people you know, that, that, uh, that, that walk in. So let's, uh, let's go from old to young. Okay. So the oldest person, you know, what rough age are we talking? Almost 90. Okay. And what kind of ailment are we talking about? Pain and lack of sleep. So this gentleman comes in and he's got his doctors, the doctor's recommendations and you know, the doctor says you make sure you don't give them too many edibles and this and that. And so it's important for the bud tender to really pay attention to what their doctor has said and to make sure that they don't get enough, especially in an elderly patient like that or to make sure they don't get too much, too much. A little bit of too much is going to make someone not ever want to use it again. And they'll have, they'll have an experience they shouldn't have. Start low, go slow, start low, go slow. So 90 years old, you have to be very careful with the host, pay everybody. But um, especially then all the way down to 21. But I would say the majority of the majority of patients are from 40 to 60 women men. Let's see. So I would say a lot of vets, a lot of that stuff.

Speaker 2: Let's talk about the vet. So we talked about like a, a, a, a very old person that is dealing mostly with pain, sleep deprivation. We can help that person out. What were you before we get to the vets, what, what, how do you relate to that person? You know, you're nowhere near 90. How do you reach that person?

Speaker 3: That probably. I probably get that from my, from my mom. We've really, we have our heart for elderly people

Speaker 2: so that elderly person can tell right away. Almost like, like I mentioned when I walked in with your dog, I can tell your dog doesn't like me right away because I'm not a dog person, but the, you know, it's not a certain parallel, but they can tell, you can tell.

Speaker 3: I think a friendly, a friendly voice and looking at someone with a smile and really listening to someone. I think they can tell that they have someone that cares if just by, you know, a friendly voice and smile and a good listener.

Speaker 2: Same approach all the way through every type of patient Ptsd, uh, folks, veterans coming in, w, you know, what is the relationship there? How do you kind of connect?

Speaker 3: Um, well, I can connect with them. I can't, I don't have a hard time connecting with anybody honestly. Oh, that's why you're good at that. I, I see them walk in the door and I start thinking about what they might need right when I see them before they even get to them. Okay. So that's one way that I, I show that I am caring I suppose and what to get them with a navy.

Speaker 2: So a ptsd kind of veteran, Kinda guy, you know, maybe 60 years old. What are you saying? So I'd walk in, you're thinking already, what are you thinking when you were.

Speaker 3: When I'm thinking and I say, how are you? Did your medicine work for you? Are you needing something a little bit more pickup? Did that make you too tired? Um, did that help with your, you know, what, what you need it to do, let's change it. If it didn't, and often they'll say, you know what, it was great. Thanks for your recommendation.

Speaker 2: Right. And then will, will you, because you mentioned, you know, you'll, you'll already started to come up with the calculus before the person comes up for the first time. What are you seeing? A limp, what are you, what are you seeing and what are you thinking, you know, for the first time? Yeah.

Speaker 3: Well, you wonder if for the first time, if they've ever had cannabis as medicine before, that's the first question that you do ask that you're absolutely right. There's a huge difference. Um, so you asked that first and a lot of these people don't think that they can get very personal if it's their first time, they're not, they don't know that it's, that they're treated like it's a pharmacy. Um, because of this bad stigma that's always been with cannabis,

Speaker 2: they don't know what to expect. They don't know what to expect. Right. Okay. So they walk up there, obviously hesitant, obviously closed and many are nervous, very nervous and you can see that you can see it. So how do you open that person up that is like, I almost don't want to even be here at all, right?

Speaker 3: I tell them something about myself that, that maybe is a little personal art. I try to get personal and that gets people to open up.

Speaker 2: What might you share if someone, if you don't know me and I come up, you're not going to share. You know what you used to do before daycare, right? No,

Speaker 3: no, I would. I would probably share that I have spinal stenosis, I have some disc disc bulges and some compression in my spine and I would share my problems, my seat sleep problems and that's what I would share my pain problems. I do. I bought how, how so I just, I don't sleep well if I

Speaker 2: are. You're not. Are you not able to fall asleep or do you wake up in the middle of the night? How does it all go? Both. Oh yeah. So that's like me too, but I also am a terrible sleeper. Terrible. Well, have you ever tried edibles for sleeping? I don't know if you can do that with your job. I haven't, but I'm in New York. You can't do that at all? Well I don't, I can't. I don't have the qualification if you will, to get a recommendation. So in, in terms of what you do here in Colorado, because it's legal, how do you deal with your sleep deprivation?

Speaker 3: I take about 30 milligrams. Okay. Every evening. Edible or um, I make, I make my own. Okay. Just have to get a little bit put in the oven. Decarboxylated putting your crock pot with your choice of oil and straight up in the morning. That's all I can do. That's it. That's it. Just like that. All right. So that's the sleep. What about the spinal stenosis you use? You can use that for that too. Or if it's during the day though, that might make it too groggy. That's chronic, right? That does not go away. No, I do have my medical, my medical card for that.

Speaker 2: Yeah. And so what do you take for that?

Speaker 3: Um, I smoked regular cannabis for that. If it's not at night, at night I just take the edibles. But during the day if it's really bad only during outbreaks and you know, if it's really bad, that's what I'll do.

Speaker 2: What do you specifically like? You know, what specifically work?

Speaker 3: Well, I have asthma too. Oh my God. This, this terrible. It could be worse, right? It absolutely can't be worse than, of course. And this is what the patients say. I say, how are you today? They say, I'm breathing. That's a popular one for patients to say. Got It. So anyhow, and then youtube and you're able to say briefly by a spinal stenosis, I have asthma. You want me to keep going? Right. Absolutely. So with that being said, the asthma that the Irb really tends to bother my lungs. So now with the concentrates, take all of the, the, the, the, the plant matter out and it seems to be much better for my lungs to just get the concentrate just a little bit. Just one little one little toke instead of smoking a bunch of leaves. Seems to be much better on my lungs.

Speaker 2: The first time I went to medicine man, I did a tour with Pete. Um, he's very good at those as, as everyone will tell you, he's a ham and he is definitely an. And He, we were walking out and I don't think you were there that day and there was an epileptic patient. You might've been there, there was an epileptic patient, a African American girl, probably not even 30. Okay. And he stops and notices her and recognizes her and said, and you know, at the time, I don't remember what he asked her, but he asked her about the specific strain, I think Canada sue probably maybe. How did that work for you? And she said, Oh Pete, I haven't had a seizure in a two weeks.

Speaker 3: Wow. That's how it is. Isn't that amazing? That's ridiculous. That is how it is. So

Speaker 2: that is where. That's as close as I come to cannabis as medicine, like seeing it in real time for real place for myself.

Speaker 3: That's how it is. I have a, a man of real big fella that has liver disease and diabetes and I said, well, why don't you try smoking this? It's high end thcv. He starts smoking this. This is all he smokes. He's just losing the weight. He's not looking as yellow. And he says, you know what Shelly, I'm getting better. And I don't know if that that's what it was or not. I didn't tell him that this is gonna cure you, but I said, why don't you just try this? THCV suppresses the appetite. That's what I was aiming for. But he's, he's feeling much better.

Speaker 2: And you said he's looks less yellow? Yeah. Is that what you said?

Speaker 3: Yeah. He doesn't look as yellow. He really very yellow the tent to a skin. So his liver was,

Speaker 2: you could see a physical difference. Is, is the point you could see it and he could. He told you about, uh, his own physical difference. Absolutely. Give us another one.

Speaker 3: Oh, I'm a woman. She's stage four. Cancer doesn't want to do anything about it. She knew that her teenagers smoke pot. So she said to her, teenagers, you know what, give me some of your weed. I need to smoke weed. And so she started smoking her teenagers pot and started getting better or not getting worse. And so we have a patient that she gets it herself. She doesn't get it from our teenagers anymore. She got her own. She, she gets her own now and she's not getting worse. She's hanging in there. She's not doing anything else. But this, and this is, this is her choice. I don't know what it's going to do four, but we'll see. What was that first conversation like with her? It's heartbreaking. I have to go home and cry. Sometimes. It's like you see a lot of sick people a lot, but it's nice to know that you know what?

Speaker 3: They walk out the door with a smile on their face and that's the best part about that job is they come in and they're sad and they're hurting and you can talk to them and you know, just a cheerful heart is almost the best medicine to talk to these people, get them feeling a little bit cheerful and give them something to where they're, they're. They have this bag of stuff that maybe be a little hope and a little relief in this bag. It brings up their spirits, helps them eat or not eat either one and they know it. They walk out smiling and it's an amazing feeling to see someone walk out smiling. It's powerful. It's powerful.

Speaker 2: Which I would imagine made it all the more difficult. When you said to sally and crew, I gotta I gotta take off for a minute here. Right? Alright. So Noah grow up and now he's 16. He's a cool dude and uh, he bought me flowers. He bought you flowers for taking care of them by really taking care of him.

Speaker 3: Well, he's not, he's, we're not going to say he's sick. He's not sick. He just has some. Well he did break his collar bone. Yeah. Well that's a different thing. I put in my two weeks notice because my son said he needed me to be with them. Post collarbone break. Yes. No, this is before. This was before the yes. Because we're dealing with other health issues of food and what we can eat and he's not able to go and since school comfortably. And so I really needed to be here for him and figure figure this out. So that's why I put in my notice and it was really hard and I have a relationship, a close relationship with a lot of patients and I didn't get to say goodbye and I email a couple of them. Matter of fact, when emailed me today, you go, she said, are you're taking care of yourself, shelly, make sure

Speaker 2: you share what's happening with you as well. I do. You do. Alright. And so now he's got this crazy eating stuff which we're getting through, right? You got to at least a little bit of a, uh, it seems like you now have, or at least a little bit of a, um, you know, there's a theme to what's happening. We know what's happening as far as what's working and what's not working as far as the food is concerned. Is that fair? We're getting there. We're getting there. And the collarbone, now this, this pops up because, you know, he's 16. And he went snowboarding and broke his collarbone. That was walking around. Fine. Six weeks later he's walking around fine. Oh,

Speaker 3: my mom worked as an orthopedic nurse for 30 years. So she helped to, she came by and she would make sure his,

Speaker 2: his collarbone was okay. And you guys got a chance to bond through this whole thing. But what is it? What is the difference? And you've been a caregiver now, basically your whole adult life, right? So you had the daycare, you're, uh, you know, bud tending with care caregiving there. Uh, now you come home past six, eight weeks, whatever it is with your, with your son. What's the difference in, in, you know, caring for your son at 8:16, he's not six know then in the daycare or at the bud tender, you know, at the bud tender stand, you know, when you're, when you're standing there and helping out. What's the difference there?

Speaker 3: It is similar. I suppose it really is the way that I care for the patients and care for them. Care for my, for my, the way I cared for to put it all together like that. But it's all a caregiver type role. Um, I, I love caring for my son and being here, I wouldn't want to be anywhere anywhere else. And being with your 16 year old son every day is not something that most parents get to do and most kids get to do with their parents. I think that he might be getting a little tired of me.

Speaker 2: Well, it doesn't seem it because I've been here, you know, for, for a little bit today and he doesn't seem, you know, I was waiting with my parents than he is with you guys at age 16. After 10 minutes he was, he's hanging out with.

Speaker 3: I think he would get tired of it, but he just asked me what are we doing tomorrow? Let's go fishing. We'd been fishing and things that don't require a lot of, a lot of too much movement, a little bit of movements. Okay. But it's everyday we take it one day at a time and if we feel good then we'll go on a hike. If not, then we'll go fishing. I saw you

Speaker 2: with your pad and pen kind of taken down, but what we ate today and it looked like you were solving, trying to solve a mystery and it feels like you do that when your bud tending. You do that here. That's what caregiving is. Is that what caregiving is for you?

Speaker 3: I suppose so. Trying to help people feel better no matter what and it's not just figuring out. I, I pray for people they don't know it. I think that I think that maybe that's what's helping the extra extra. They don't know what it's like. I'm just, you know, it's a secret. Why is it for my son to divorce? Why? Why is it a secret? I wonder. I don't know. I,

Speaker 3: I suppose I'm a bit, it's not that I'm afraid to say about my religion, but I, I maybe. I wouldn't say it's a humble thing, but I don't want to make a big deal about it. I just want to see what. I just want to see what their reaction without even them knowing. I suppose I sit, they don't need to know. I'm crying. Know why burden them with what I'm doing. It's gonna help. It's gonna be great. That's how I feel. I strongly believe in. My beliefs are very strong, very strong, right. Matter of fact, I got into right before I left medicine, man, I, there's some wonderful employees there and they all have their really cool beliefs which I started picking up on, but not because of them, but I started getting into Tarot cards, Taro, Taro cards. So much so it was bad. Really, really bad lunch. Too much. This is not what I believe, right? Counterintuitive. Very much so. Very much so. I would, you know, toxic. I would say, hey, so and so I pulled a card for you this morning and he'd be like, I pulled the same one. And so I was getting into that a little bit too much. And so recently I've burned it all. I'm done with it. Um, and I, I feel like that's not, that's not me. I don't know why I did. I get the sense,

Speaker 2: shelly, that you are a person that lives literally lives in the moment. In other words, when you say you speak of working at medicine, man in past tense, even though you and I talked about the fact that you'll probably go back is what you and I were talking about, um, you, you, you speak of everything in the current tense. If this did happen, this is happening, what's going to happen? I don't know if you, do you notice that you do that by the way that you live in the moment? That much? I, I, uh, I think I'm noticing that.

Speaker 3: No, but I think that's interesting.

Speaker 2: What about, what's going to happen? How about, well, what's going to happen in six weeks? What's happened in four weeks? When is done with the, with the collarbone, he's

Speaker 3: what is going to happen in four weeks. What do you like? It's, it's, I've never had my plate open or I can do anything. I want my, if you know, I. What am I going to do? Am I going to go back to medicine man and, and work in one of their new still hearse maybe. I mean maybe her and other opportunities as well. There's going to be A. I don't know if I'm supposed to say. Well, there's a lot going on. There's a lot going on. It is going to be a lot of opportunity and maybe a place up in the mountains I've retreat. That would be ideal is to run a retreat. Well that's your whole thing. Anyway. That's daycare for adults right there. That is what that is. And Pun intended. Shelly. That's a terrible pun. We're going to do the three final questions.

Speaker 2: Okay. I'm going to tell you what they are and then I'll ask you then, what has most surprised you in cannabis? What has most surprised you in life and on the soundtrack of Shelly Schneider's life? What is one track, one song that has to be on there? So first things first. What has most surprised you in cannabis?

Speaker 3: Most surprised me in cannabis. The age, the age range of all of the people. And then it, the majority are not in their twenties. It's 50, 50 years old. That's, that's most surprising. Um, no, actually I take that back. Most surprising is that my mother agreed to this all that is the most surprising. And then I don't have to hide that. I smoke marijuana in front of my mother anymore. She's so nonjudgmental, but it had the stigma for so long.

Speaker 2: Yeah. Well that's the family business now. So

Speaker 3: it, that's surprises me. Like really I am. It blows my mind that this is where we are.

Speaker 2: Does it blow your mom's mind as well, do you think? Absolutely. But this is all this absolutely crazy, crazy. What has most surprised you in life?

Speaker 3: I'm not surprised me in life.

Speaker 2: That's a tough question. Yeah, it's the biggest question most surprised me.

Speaker 3: Well, it's not really a surprise, but it's something that I forget. And um, but then it's like, Oh yes, it's surprised, but it's not really. It's God, it's that he's there all the time and I forget and then I'm like, oh, it's a surprise. Really. I'm here. I'm, I'm taking care of you. Don't you see. So that is, that's the biggest.

Speaker 2: What was the, the most surprised you surprised me that surprised me in life is yeah, I've. So I'm realizing because I'm a Jew when we've talked about that, and then, you know, I've, I've heard that phrase Jesus saves. I think that it's really actually true in, for, for you. I think that that's. There's no question about that. No question. Absolutely A. Okay, let's go a little bit lighter now that we'd discussed that. As far as the soundtrack of Shelly Schneider's life, what is one track? One Song that has to be on there?

Speaker 3: Oh, it's too corny. Oh No, it's not now that, but it has to do with my husband and his. It's but he is my life, so it's endless love that would be.

Speaker 2: You are a hopeless romantic. That's the perfect answer. You are. This is why everyone says you're nice, Shelly. Love is endless. It's all about of course, but now you can kind of get the sense of why everybody thinks that you're nice. When you say endless love is your fees, your song, right? Because that's more than pleasant is what that is. Shelly's united so much. Exactly. Thank you very much. Appreciate your time. You're welcome. Thank you. It's fun. All right, and there you have Shelly Schneider,

Speaker 1: so the whole crew, the whole medicine man, family and business. So interesting. So that is why we're doing the twelfth part documentary. First three parts of which are up on Youtube as we speak. Search, work can economy two ends in the word economy. We'd love to hear your thoughts. Thank you. As always, for listening.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.