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Episode #147 – Aaron Smith, NCIA

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Episode #147 - Aaron Smith, NCIA

Episode #147 – Aaron Smith, NCIA

With a dip back in history to Aaron Smith’s first visit on Episode 7, we continue to the present as it’s high tide for Aaron and the NCIA as Lobby Days just occurred in DC and the Cannabis Business Summit is coming up in Oakland.  Aaron takes us through the activity in DC and key wins from Lobby Days.  Aaron also talks through some key sessions coming up at the Cannabis Business Summit. And if you have 4 seconds, we’d very much appreciate you filling out our survey at survey.libsyn.com/canneconomy

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Aaron smith

Speaker 2: was episode seven, way back when Aaron came on and kind of introduced himself to us. We introduced ourselves and he gave her a real poignant story and it really sets up a where we are now by going back to where we were and where he was then. And if you

Speaker 1: don't mind, I'd love to get into what did happen when you were a teenager, as much as you want to share with us a, a, a, you know, because it'll inform us as to why you're such a, a, a, you know, a big part of the movement, uh, and a passionate part of the movement. And the other thing is, uh, it might help other folks that are facing the same type of thing that you faced. So you mentioned, uh, you know, uh, running with police and uh, I think even use the word brutality. How much can you share with us about what happened?

Speaker 3: Yeah, it's not something I talk about a lot, but I'm sure you know, I, I was, uh, uh, you know, kind of an awkward. I'm goth kid with dark hair and makeup and a black trench coat. This was pre columbine. Um, and I, uh, was in a fairly small town in Sonoma county where I grew up, which I'm actually, you know, I thought I knew all of the police officers that really regularly patrol the area as, you know, as teenage kids do. I was out about many nights. I'm a but an officer actually pulled up, um, to me when I was walking down the street and jumped out of his car, yelled a lot of profanity at me and, you know, basically, um, you know, told me to put my hands on the hood and I did a, he wouldn't tell me what, you know, why he was stopping me.

Speaker 3: Um, and at some point, somehow along the line, I ended up getting hit in the head and thrown to the ground. Um, next thing I know, I woke up hog tied in the back of a vehicle of the, of the police vehicle. Um, and what had happened was he had strangled me until I associate it's fixated and passed out my, the blood blood vessels in my eyes burst. So I had really super blood red eyes for a weeks and weeks after that. Um, and, you know, when I ended up getting taken to a hospital where I was drug tested against my without even actually, not against my will, but without even a warning, I was down tied with my arms behind my back on him on a stretcher and they just stuck a needle in my arm without even saying anything. Um, and then, uh, they, you know, I didn't have my id on me because I was not driving, um, and I was a kid, didn't care my id.

Speaker 3: I did have a small amount of marijuana on me, like maybe a gram or half a gram. And then that was kind of, you know, what they ended up using to justify what they did. Um, they, they found out I was a minor. Um, eventually they believe me and they called my parents who came down with my id. Um, and at that point I could tell they kind of freaked out because they think they thought I was older than I was. Um, you know, it's illegal to drug test minors without their consent. Um, so I received, I actually did not get charged with any crimes, uh, at all, uh, because I mean, and, and marijuana is decriminalized in California anyway, although I was a minor, um, but they, you know, I think that it really was a transformative time in my life where I really started seeing, um, the, uh, the brutality of government and that, you know, while I believe that there is a role in government for government, um, it's always really important to understand that whenever we're using government to achieve our social means of any kind, it means we're using force because that's really the only thing that government has a monopoly on.

Speaker 3: Um, you know, the government's the only a entity in the country that can legally a hurt people and kill people and throw people in cages for not doing what the government wants them to do. Um, and, you know, and that all that I think that, you know, that's a when you can, when it comes to things like national security and, and, you know, keeping violent people off the streets, I think that's entirely appropriate. But when you're talking about a victimless crimes like drug crimes and certainly a marijuana crimes where, uh, you know, we were talking about a natural substance that's safer than then, you know, most most, uh, prescription drugs and certainly safer than alcohol. Um, it absolutely makes no sense to a, to be using the force of government to, to keep, keep people from using the substance. And so I, you know, I think that inspired me to get involved in the libertarian freedom oriented side of things as an activist and then, and, and especially, uh, the war on drugs, you know, as I mentioned, I think is a, you know, one of the, you know, the biggest, one of the worst violators of human liberty and certainly one of the worst domestic policies in our country right now.

Speaker 1: Aaron smith

Speaker 2: was episode seven, way back when Aaron came on and kind of introduced himself to us. We introduced ourselves and he gave her a real poignant story and it really sets up a where we are now by going back to where we were and where he was then. And if you

Speaker 1: don't mind, I'd love to get into what did happen when you were a teenager, as much as you want to share with us a, a, a, you know, because it'll inform us as to why you're such a, a, a, you know, a big part of the movement, uh, and a passionate part of the movement. And the other thing is, uh, it might help other folks that are facing the same type of thing that you faced. So you mentioned, uh, you know, uh, running with police and uh, I think even use the word brutality. How much can you share with us about what happened?

Speaker 3: Yeah, it's not something I talk about a lot, but I'm sure you know, I, I was, uh, uh, you know, kind of an awkward. I'm goth kid with dark hair and makeup and a black trench coat. This was pre columbine. Um, and I, uh, was in a fairly small town in Sonoma county where I grew up, which I'm actually, you know, I thought I knew all of the police officers that really regularly patrol the area as, you know, as teenage kids do. I was out about many nights. I'm a but an officer actually pulled up, um, to me when I was walking down the street and jumped out of his car, yelled a lot of profanity at me and, you know, basically, um, you know, told me to put my hands on the hood and I did a, he wouldn't tell me what, you know, why he was stopping me.

Speaker 3: Um, and at some point, somehow along the line, I ended up getting hit in the head and thrown to the ground. Um, next thing I know, I woke up hog tied in the back of a vehicle of the, of the police vehicle. Um, and what had happened was he had strangled me until I associate it's fixated and passed out my, the blood blood vessels in my eyes burst. So I had really super blood red eyes for a weeks and weeks after that. Um, and, you know, when I ended up getting taken to a hospital where I was drug tested against my without even actually, not against my will, but without even a warning, I was down tied with my arms behind my back on him on a stretcher and they just stuck a needle in my arm without even saying anything. Um, and then, uh, they, you know, I didn't have my id on me because I was not driving, um, and I was a kid, didn't care my id.

Speaker 3: I did have a small amount of marijuana on me, like maybe a gram or half a gram. And then that was kind of, you know, what they ended up using to justify what they did. Um, they, they found out I was a minor. Um, eventually they believe me and they called my parents who came down with my id. Um, and at that point I could tell they kind of freaked out because they think they thought I was older than I was. Um, you know, it's illegal to drug test minors without their consent. Um, so I received, I actually did not get charged with any crimes, uh, at all, uh, because I mean, and, and marijuana is decriminalized in California anyway, although I was a minor, um, but they, you know, I think that it really was a transformative time in my life where I really started seeing, um, the, uh, the brutality of government and that, you know, while I believe that there is a role in government for government, um, it's always really important to understand that whenever we're using government to achieve our social means of any kind, it means we're using force because that's really the only thing that government has a monopoly on.

Speaker 3: Um, you know, the government's the only a entity in the country that can legally a hurt people and kill people and throw people in cages for not doing what the government wants them to do. Um, and, you know, and that all that I think that, you know, that's a when you can, when it comes to things like national security and, and, you know, keeping violent people off the streets, I think that's entirely appropriate. But when you're talking about a victimless crimes like drug crimes and certainly a marijuana crimes where, uh, you know, we were talking about a natural substance that's safer than then, you know, most most, uh, prescription drugs and certainly safer than alcohol. Um, it absolutely makes no sense to a, to be using the force of government to, to keep, keep people from using the substance. And so I, you know, I think that inspired me to get involved in the libertarian freedom oriented side of things as an activist and then, and, and especially, uh, the war on drugs, you know, as I mentioned, I think is a, you know, one of the, you know, the biggest, one of the worst violators of human liberty and certainly one of the worst domestic policies in our country right now.

Speaker 1: Uh, and now we can certainly understand why that is a personal belief of yours. Um, thank you for sharing that and, and you know, how much of that experience did, did shape that kind of opinion? Obviously an experience like that is going to change somebody. Um, you know, did you have, uh, any thoughts about the war on drugs or political leanings before this or, you know, how much did it change or how much did it just reinforce what you already thought?

Speaker 3: I mean, I guess it Kinda did reinforce what I already thought. Um, you know, I believed know I believe that marijuana should be legal. Um, I wasn't politically active. I mean I was 16 years old that smoke pot. Certainly most of the people in my community and in my, my, me and my parents community up there in northern California, uh, hold the same belief. It's kind of a given up that way. Um, and, you know, but I think it, uh, it actually made me start thinking about the bigger picture and not just about, you know, marijuana should be legal because I like it. Um, you know, marijuana should be legal because it's an inherent right of a human being to put any substance into their body that they see fit. And in that, if, you know, if we have these basic tenants, uh, in the country, in this country and one of them is personal freedom, um, you know, I don't think there, if you don't have the ability to put a substance in your own body and have ownership over your own body, well I don't think you really have many freedoms at all because, uh, that's, you know, that should be the um, you know, really the one of the core core freedoms that any, any person has, whether it be in this country or anywhere else.

Speaker 3: Aaron Smith

Speaker 2: returns for Aaron Smith and a lobby days just occurred in DC and the cannabis business summit is coming up in Oakland. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social networks and youtube with the handle can economy. That's two ends and the word economy. And if you're so inclined, I'd very much appreciate your filling out our survey@surveydotLibsyn.com. Slash Academy, that's Lib Syn is Nancy. Aaron takes us through the activity in DC and key wins from lobby days also talks through some key sessions coming up at the cannabis business summit. Looking forward to it. Hope you're looking forward to this parent. Smith. Okay.

Speaker 4: So Aaron Smith, uh, one of the busiest guys in cannabis. Uh, you're here. Hello. How are you?

Speaker 3: Hey Seth, thanks for having me on again.

Speaker 4: So lobby days just happened. Um, you know, first off, give us the context of lobby days, how long you've been doing it and what the purpose is and then we'll get into exactly what happened this year.

Speaker 3: Uh, yeah, we've been doing lobby days for six years since we started. That's been, uh, you know, one of our core events for our members to participate in and really the purpose of, of conducting the fly in and DC is so that members of Congress and their staff can hear from professionals in the cannabis industry directly and hear the personal stories about how things like the banking access nightmare, uh, affects them rather than hearing about it in the media and hearing about it from our lobbyists. You know, that's one thing, but sometimes there's just more power and personal stories and also, you know, at point it's also just to show our strength in numbers. We had a 150 cannabis business professionals in DC and, and uh, that alone a really, really was a phenomenal a showing.

Speaker 4: So, you know, before we get into the specifics of this year, what do you think overall, uh, the biggest differences are from the first year that, uh, that you did this to, to the current year, what kind of advances generally have been made?

Speaker 3: Well, I mean, the, the, the obvious advances that the first year I think we had four, maybe five people come out to DC and uh, this year we had 150, so that's, you know, that's a huge difference right there just showing the growth of the industry. But really the reception with the offices, uh, has, has really changed dramatically. Um, you know, it used to be really difficult to even get a meeting with a lot of members of congress unless they were already our champions. It was, you know, they would kind of laugh us off and now we're, we're definitely being taken seriously. Uh, we, you know, not only can get meetings with members of Congress but you know, members are actually or their staff or reaching out to us because they want to talk about these issues and learn more about the industry in states, you know, in the states that have legal cannabis. And so the, the reception is really, um, like night and day from now to, to where we were in 2011 when we first first did lobby days.

Speaker 4: Yeah. Fantastic. Okay. So then let's jump into processive. What did happen, first off, you know, maybe a, a name or two of, of who reached out to you guys, uh, that you might have been surprised to hear from?

Speaker 3: Well, yeah, for example, a Congressman Patrick Murphy from, uh, from Florida who's going to be running for running for Senate this year, uh, you know, he reached out to us wanting to meet with members of the industry to learn more about what's going on and in, in states with legal, medical marijuana given the, that's also going to be on the ballot a while he's in November in Florida. Um, and you know, that, uh, was really just great to be able to educate a members and their staff on, on these issues that are eventually going to affect everybody because we know that marijuana reform is sweeping the country. Uh, and while, you know, in a state like Florida, uh, it's still in the nascent phase where they're probably not thinking about things like to add he or banking, uh, at this point. But by this time next year, they absolutely will.

Speaker 4: It'll be a, it'll be a different story in Florida. Note, no question. Uh, what about some of the, some of the old friends, of course, you know, we're probably familiar with them, but go ahead and let's, uh, let's call them off. Uh, folks that you have been talking to consistently over the years.

Speaker 3: Uh, yeah. We had a press conference with a Congressman Earl Blumenauer, a spoke a congressman Polis Jared Polis from Boulder, Colorado at perlmutter from Colorado. Right. Barbara Lee was in attendance from California, uh, denny heck from Washington. Um, we, you know, we also had an eleanor Holmes Norton from a district of Columbia, so we had a really good showing at the press conference with that, kicked off the lobby days events on Thursday morning and then concluded it with, with another event with multiple members of Congress in attendance, which was a reception fundraiser for our political action committee in, uh, on the evening, on Thursday. So I think I counted 11 members of Congress, uh, participated in our events between the, between the press conference and the pack reception.

Speaker 4: That's fantastic. It really is. It's unbelievable what you guys are doing with that. Um, you know, you, you mentioned, uh, a one or two folks that have reached out to you. You mentioned old friends. What about just a new folks, uh, you know, relationships that came out of this year's lobby days.

Speaker 3: Well, you know, the, the, the way of life on the hill is that, uh, there's a lot of young staffers who really run the show and, and uh, there's a high turnover rate with congressional staffers. Um, so it's really, you know, almost all of them are new to the issue, uh, at any given time because of the turnover. So it's really important that we hit as many offices as we can and continue to keep them educated and they, and when I say they turn over, they get other jobs in, in politics or in government. And it's important to keep to keep these folks, uh, I'm well informed on what's going on and, and knowledgeable of our issues. So there were know, like I, there countless new contacts were made. Uh, I think we hit a 400 offices, which is, you know, three quarters of, of Congress, um, with, with drop ins and then we had almost 200 scheduled meetings throughout the two days.

Speaker 4: That's amazing. And you know, what we were, uh, doing a lot to, to kind of showcase what, uh, the information that you share and the reason that you do it. What about you, you, you're talking about 200 meetings, a, you and the NCIA staff. What, what did you guys come away with is as maybe lessons learned or you know, new information that you hadn't considered prior to going to lobby days?

Speaker 3: No. Well, it's just great to see everybody out, uh, to, you know, a lot of new members on our side. You know, we talked about, we talked about new congressional staffers, but I met a lot of new NCIA members that were really enthusiastic about the mission and the work and the work that they're doing, you know, that we are doing collectively, uh, at the association and, and that was really gratifying to me to get to meet somebody new faces and uh, to spend time with some folks that were, you know, were literally there the first lobby days when it was only five people. Um, so it was, it was, I think really energizing for, uh, for our members to be able to connect with each other while, you know, while working in the service of, of marijuana reform and uh, it's, it's not like another event where it's a social hour or an educational event where you're listening to speakers and panelists. It's actually a, you know, the, the attendees have lobby days are participants and uh, it's just really gratifying to see everybody working together toward a common goal.

Speaker 4: That's awesome. What about from a congress people, um, anything come up from, from their side that you hadn't anticipated?

Speaker 3: Um, you know, well, for example, we, we met with congresswoman Diana to get from Denver who's been a good supporter of the industry, um, and you know, we had something like 25 of the 150 lobby day attendees were from her district and so she, she attended a pack reception, but more interestingly than that, you know, we, we had a delegation of her constituents, a meeting in her office and asking about to ate because she, while she's been very supportive on other issues, she had not signed on as a cosponsor to, uh, the two ate reform legislation as of yet. And she actually let us know that, you know, the reason that she hadn't signed onto it was that she was anticipating a more comprehensive tax reform come coming out of Congress, which, which hasn't happened. Uh, and then decided, you know, on the spot that, okay, now's the time I'm getting on the to 80 bill. And, and so because of the meetings that she had with her constituents during lobby days, she's now a cosponsor of the marijuana tax equity act.

Speaker 4: I mean, that's huge. That is, that's huge. That is exactly why you go there and do that. That's amazing. A new sponsor have to add legislation. That's fantastic. I mean, how enthused were you in the group from, from that realization, you know, in real time.

Speaker 3: Oh yeah. I mean, it was just really gratifying to see tangible progress of any kind, you know, and especially, you know, when you're working at the federal level, you're kind of at this 35,000 foot level where, where it. And it also seems like things just take forever to change because, because they do that because Congress doesn't, doesn't, uh, act really quickly on really anything. Um, and this has been a long fight for decades and to, so to see that kind of tangible progress to see conservatives also coming over and voting for things like the Rohrabacher Farr, medical marijuana amendment, um, you know, it was really, really gratifying. And to see the work paying off,

Speaker 4: uh, yeah. And, and let's actually just checked these things to make sure, you know, as far as, uh, folks listening, you know, a lot of industry folks do listen, but folks outside of the industry do listen as well. Do you mind just kind of giving the overview on [inaudible] as well as your back or far from your perspective? Because I think that that's important.

Speaker 3: That's section two, eight e of the Internal Revenue Code is a provision that does not allow a ordinary business deductions to be taken in any, anything, any expense associated with a so called drug trafficking that was put in place in the early eighties because there was a case where somebody who was a cocaine trafficker was, was, you know, paying their to actually paying their taxes and deducting the expense of the, you know, the speed boats or whatever that they, they had, uh, associated with the smuggling of cocaine. Well, today, unfortunately, it's mostly a provision of the tax code that punishes legal, medical, cannabis and adult use cannabis businesses across the country. Uh, because again, marijuana is still illegal under federal law and federal law does not see any difference between a state authorized marijuana distribution and black market. Uh, so that's to ate and we're, we're working, uh, you know, to educate members of Congress and to advance legislation, uh, that would make it an exemption to, to 80 for a state authorized a cannabis cannabis distribution. And Rohrabacher Farr is a, as an amendment that's now past and into the federal budget two years running that prevents the Department of Justice from a spending your tax dollars to undermine state medical cannabis laws. So, you know, that means a no raids or prosecutions of state legal, medical cannabis dispensaries or patients and providers.

Speaker 4: It, it's a nice support for the coal memos. Right. You know.

Speaker 3: Right. And, you know, this is, you know, we still, we still need to actually change the statutes that criminalized marijuana and under federal law. But, uh, you know, again, this is a long, long road and these appropriations amendments or ways that, you know, that we can get a step closer to where we need to be. Um, and you know, it shows that we, you know, we now have support in a very conservative congress for medical marijuana and we actually are really close to having support for a similar provision, uh, that would keep the Department of Justice from using tax dollars to undermining any state marijuana law were just a handful of votes away from that.

Speaker 4: And then all we have to do is have them vote on it. Right? You know.

Speaker 3: Well. And so, so often that's the challenge is actually getting anything out onto the floor for a vote. And that's, you know, that the reason that we're seeing, you know, Congress stalling on all of these issues is really has little to do with cannabis. Um, they're just, you know, for example, this year, it's not looking, it's not looking like a congress is likely to pass a budget at all, uh, which, which makes it so that it's near impossible to get any of these appropriations amendments through this year and it. So it has nothing to do with, with the, the policy behind the marijuana appropriations provisions. It has to do with Congress and their, you know, their partisan gridlock and inability to govern, which is frustrating to everybody in this country, not just cannabis policy reformers.

Speaker 4: Indeed. All right, so, so that was a lobby days and you know, it, it's kind of works as a great foray into the cannabis business summit because, you know, some of those same folks, some of the same, uh, legislators, Congress people will be on site, uh, for the NCIA event in Oakland and what will be about a month. Um, you know, what, what, uh,

Speaker 3: w

Speaker 4: who on the program are you excited

Speaker 3: to see? Oh, well, I'm really excited about about the, the whole three days actually. Um, but, but, uh, Gavin newsome is keynoting on the first morning, the lieutenant governor of California who has been an outspoken advocate for the adult use of marijuana act in California. Um, I think it's the first time a lieutenant governor of any state, much less the largest state in the country has addressed a cannabis industry conference. So I'm really, really excited about, uh, about having him there. Um, as well as, as a number of other great sessions that'll be happening throughout the event in Oakland.

Speaker 4: Yeah. This is the first time that it's a, you know, in Oakland has been in Denver for the past few years. Why the switch?

Speaker 3: Well, you know, uh, with, with the ballot initiative in California, I think, you know, all eyes are on uh, California and uh, especially the bay area which is really, you know, kind of the birthplace of a cannabis medical cannabis for sure. And marijuana policy reform, you know, Oakland has had a, has, has, had marijuana officially it's lowest law enforcement priority for I think close to a decade now. Um, so it really just, you know, this year made sense to, to move it there because there's just so much interest in California as they very well should be, you know, when California regulates the marijuana market that, that market represents, um, you know, it's a behemoth. I mean, California is such a big state that, that'll, you know, that market will be larger than all of the other legal states combined that we have the for legal states that we have now. So a lot of opportunity there.

Speaker 4: Absolutely. And just spoke to Amanda Reiman yesterday and she said, uh, we are in fact on the ballot. Right. So that's good news.

Speaker 3: Yeah, that's right.

Speaker 4: So, so good. So, uh, as far as uh, the, you know, the, the few days that will be there, you know, we talked about the keynote, we talked about the reason that we moved it to to Oakland. Uh, what, what other sessions are, what other information, you know, are you excited to share, uh, about the, uh, about the summit, about the event, about the three days.

Speaker 3: Yeah, it's, well it's June 20th through 22nd at the Oakland Convention Center. The first day is kicking off with some additional workshops that are really hands hands on in depth workshops on, you know, things like operations, you know, dispensary operations, a green cultivation, um, all, all sorts of, really just the whole array of different topics that participants can get involved in. Um, as well as tours. We'll have tours of places like harborside health center and others, you know, other, uh, key businesses in the area. Um, and then the big Dick kicks off with Gavin newsome keynote on the next Tuesday. Uh, there's also a session that I think is going to be really great with a med Raheem who's the CEO of new me, organic tea, which you might've seen the on the shelves at whole foods and all over the country. Um, he's, he also runs a nonprofit and a dedicated.

Speaker 3: I'm just a dedicated business leader who's working to, you know, make sure that they're, you know, looking at the triple bottom line, not just profit, but people also, I'm really reinvesting into their communities and the places around the world where they source t, uh, he'll be on stage with some, a cannabis business leaders talking about how the cannabis industry should, can also apply the triple bottom line principals, uh, as, as we grow, you know, into, into this large industry so that we don't become another big tobacco and other big Pharma, you know, it's really important that cannabis, uh, maintain a certain unique culture that we have even after we become the multibillion dollar a national or international industry.

Speaker 4: Yeah. No. And, you know, many people say just that, you know, let's become a great industry as opposed to just another industry. Um, and there are so many ways that, uh, that we could do that. Um, you know, as far as NCAA, obviously it's an association, um, you know, donations for things like a lobby days working folks go to do that.

Speaker 3: All right, well, the most important thing is, is to become a member of the CIA, which can be find out easily how to@thecannabisindustry.org. Uh, and also if, uh, you know, come out and meet the association and hear some of these great topics happening at the cannabis business summit. Uh, you could find that on our website as well, or go straight to cannabis business summit.com to register. And uh, we'd love to see everybody out in Oakland next month.

Speaker 4: Excellent. Okay. So that, that is, uh, that goal, a check that box, fantastic. Look forward to seeing folks there. Uh, as far as from now until November. Um, you know, we're kind of getting a prognostications are at least some thoughts on what we think is going to happen, you know, once we do hit election day, we've got so many states on the ballot and, you know, other activity around the country. What are your thoughts as we make our way towards November knowing that we're in May of 2016 right now?

Speaker 3: Well, I mean, I, I am really optimistic that we're going to win a pretty big sweep in November. Um, but it's, it's, you know, we've got probably $7 initiatives out there, five adult use to maybe even more on the medical side. Um, you know, and I, I, I don't, I don't, I want to say it is ours to lose. Um, it's not, they're not just going to magically pass. They're going to pass because of, uh, you know, investors donating to the campaigns and you know, people who are invested in, in reform need to contribute. Even if they, you know, whatever they can afford, even if it's $5, $10, $100, $5,000, um, it's really important to, to contribute to these campaigns. So that they can buy the advertising that they need, uh, and pay for the, you know, the on the, on the ground effort that it takes to get these laws passed.

Speaker 3: I'm also, it'll require, you know, volunteers to volunteer for the campaigns. And then of course your vote, you know, these things, just laws don't change on their own. They changed because dedicated people make it happen. Uh, and so I think that, uh, I think that we're going to see as long as all of those things fall into place, the people and the money, uh, to, to pass these initiatives. I think that we're going to see a pretty, a huge victory in November. Um, you know, I think, you know, sick five or six of these paths and that's game changing, especially again, like we talked about California being such a large population center.

Speaker 4: No, it, it, uh, it, it does look positive. I think Arizona is still looking iffy, so, you know, focus resources there, I guess, uh, you know, if you're, if you're listening. And then Nevada, of course, we got a not such great news with Sheldon Adelson, in fact, putting out a survey. I don't know if he's committed money just yet, but, uh, that's always kind of around the corner, isn't it?

Speaker 3: Right. So if we're, you know, but we can, we have the truth on our side. So I think we can, we can overcome a opponents like Adelson but, but again, it's going to take a money and resources.

Speaker 4: Yeah. No, it is always good to be in a position where truths and a truth and facts are on your side. Right? You know.

Speaker 3: That's right.

Speaker 4: All right, final question. We've asked you, you know, what surprised you most in cannabis? What's surprised you most in life before we might've even gotten gotten a, a, a song from you? But, uh, as we speak today on the soundtrack of the errand, Smith's life, what is one track or one song that's gotta be on there? I know you've got your punk rock bone, a fee days, but, uh, what, what song would you give us?

Speaker 3: Oh Geez, let's, uh, let's go with a rush song. Let's go with Tom Sawyer.

Speaker 4: Oh, well, it's about freedom.

Speaker 3: Individuality.

Speaker 4: Absolutely. Uh, that's Today's time store by the way.

Speaker 3: That's right.

Speaker 4: Fantastic. Thanks for the rush tune Aaron Smith. I will see you in just about a month that the, uh, Ncia event and thanks of course for your time. We know you're busy. Thank you. And there you have Aaron Smith.

Speaker 2: So, you know, it seems like everything is moving in the right direction. I'm so happy to be on this ride. Happy that you are on the ride with us. I can't thank you enough for listening. Very much. Appreciate your time as.

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Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.