fbpx

Instant Ep: Raid Preparedness w/Debby Goldsberry

Cannabis Economy Podcast
Instant Ep: Raid Preparedness w/Debby Goldsberry

Instant Ep: Raid Preparedness w/Debby Goldsberry

Debby Goldsberry joins us to discuss raid preparedness in the wake of the press secretary saying the administration sees adult-use cannabis as different than medical. In his comments, he referenced adult-use cannabis in relation to the opioid crisis- which it has absolutely nothing to do with…and if anything is a potential solution. The ignorance is stunning.
The 10th amendment reads: The Powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution nor prohibited by it to the States are reserved to the States respectively or to the people.
The 10th amendment has been referenced for the past 50 years in relation to personal and corporate liberty. Where’s the consistency in the philosophy as it relates to state cannabis laws?The hypocrisy is mind blowing.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Raid preparedness, Debbie Goldsberry joins us to discuss rape preparedness in the wake of the press secretary saying the administration sees adult use cannabis as different than medical. In his comments he referenced the adult use cannabis in relation to the opioid crisis, which it has absolutely nothing to do with, and if anything is a potential solution, the ignorance is stunning. The 10th amendment reads the powers not delegated to the United States by the constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states are reserved to the states respectively or to the people. The 10th amendment has been referenced for the past 50 years in relation to personal and corporate liberty. Where's the consistency in the philosophy as it relates to the state cannabis laws? The hypocrisy is mindblowing. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm Seth Adler. Here's an instant episode with Debbie Goldsberry. It's good to talk to you.

Speaker 2: Hi. Yes, I'm glad to talk to you too. Nice to chat again.

Speaker 3: Absolutely. So first, before we get to what we're going to get to, what were your thoughts on, um, you know, seeing the press secretary say what he did?

Speaker 2: Well look, I figured some kind of hammer was going to drop. We know that age sessions is not a fan of marijuana based on his old comments about it and we know that trump is following a very conservative agenda. So I figured marijuana was going to be hit at some point. I also know anybody in their right mind isn't coming fully after marijuana because the visuals of upsetting a bunch of medical marijuana patients and you suddenly they're protesting outside the White House. It just doesn't work. And by now enough people know that marijuana really is medicine, that it's helping people who are very critically ill. Nobody wants to come after medical marijuana right now. So I guess I guess I, I guess I figured, yeah, this is probably what's to be expected. We've medical alone to some degree, they're going to go after adult personal use now to what degree and, and now that they've made the statement, what can we do to make sure that doesn't happen?

Speaker 3: Right? So as far as, you know, um, the, the rest of the commentary, what really, uh, you know, uh, first off the, uh, kind of disingenuousness of, uh, you know, the 10th amendment being so important and the until it's not, um, you know, the hypocrisy there was striking, um, but, but also then the ignorance around the comment about the opioid crisis and linking that to, to cannabis where if anything, cannabis is a solution. Uh, did you happen to cap catch that? Uh, that portion of the commentary

Speaker 2: that's course I watched that press conference and it's just nothing more than another alternative fact being put forth by that administration that doesn't have any basis. In fact, it proves their ignorance and the fact that they're not looking at real data before they comment on topics of such importance. Uni knows that that medical marijuana is actually bringing down the use of opioids and that in states where it's legalized, there's less abuse and there's less problem with overdose. I'm in the states that marijuana is legal. The statement is a complete, just not even true in the slightest. And in fact, it's dangerous and harmful to America to be making statements like that.

Speaker 3: So, uh, yeah, no. And then as far as statements are concerned, um, we need to state obviously that the press secretary does not set policy, although he, you know, he, he did certainly sound informed. He kind of checked without name checking Rohrabacher Farr. So, um, you know, uh, yes, he doesn't make policy, but he did sound informed, right?

Speaker 2: Yeah. I mean, what he sounded like he knew is that the, that attorney general sessions really was interested in going after adult use of marijuana. He sounded like he had some kind of knowledge that, that policy was being discussed and that we could see some action on it. And that was worrisome. I mean, on, on the flip side, like you're saying, he did mention the amendment that was passed by Congress. Hopefully it'll continue to be passed or maybe we'll get a budget one of these days and it'll just be in there. He did mention that that the robotic or amendment was going to be enforced, which is great because that means that the, um, the Department of Justice won't be spending money enforcing federal law in medical marijuana states that's positive, but that whole other flip of the coin, the alternative facts and the fact that they're going to waste time and money going after adult personal users of marijuana.

Speaker 2: That is just disgusting. The other thing I didn't like is calling marijuana recreational use. I'm not even sure what that means. The recreational use of marijuana. I mean people use marijuana for their own personal uses. Recreational is just another word that has no meaning and does this. It's just meant to diminish the importance that marijuana plays in people's lives and to try and differentiate hugely between adult personal use of marijuana and medical marijuana is again, just nonsense. People use marijuana because it helps them feel better whether they're, whether they're adult personal users or medical marijuana users. It makes people feel better and that's why they use it.

Speaker 1: Raid preparedness, Debbie Goldsberry joins us to discuss rape preparedness in the wake of the press secretary saying the administration sees adult use cannabis as different than medical. In his comments he referenced the adult use cannabis in relation to the opioid crisis, which it has absolutely nothing to do with, and if anything is a potential solution, the ignorance is stunning. The 10th amendment reads the powers not delegated to the United States by the constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states are reserved to the states respectively or to the people. The 10th amendment has been referenced for the past 50 years in relation to personal and corporate liberty. Where's the consistency in the philosophy as it relates to the state cannabis laws? The hypocrisy is mindblowing. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm Seth Adler. Here's an instant episode with Debbie Goldsberry. It's good to talk to you.

Speaker 2: Hi. Yes, I'm glad to talk to you too. Nice to chat again.

Speaker 3: Absolutely. So first, before we get to what we're going to get to, what were your thoughts on, um, you know, seeing the press secretary say what he did?

Speaker 2: Well look, I figured some kind of hammer was going to drop. We know that age sessions is not a fan of marijuana based on his old comments about it and we know that trump is following a very conservative agenda. So I figured marijuana was going to be hit at some point. I also know anybody in their right mind isn't coming fully after marijuana because the visuals of upsetting a bunch of medical marijuana patients and you suddenly they're protesting outside the White House. It just doesn't work. And by now enough people know that marijuana really is medicine, that it's helping people who are very critically ill. Nobody wants to come after medical marijuana right now. So I guess I guess I, I guess I figured, yeah, this is probably what's to be expected. We've medical alone to some degree, they're going to go after adult personal use now to what degree and, and now that they've made the statement, what can we do to make sure that doesn't happen?

Speaker 3: Right? So as far as, you know, um, the, the rest of the commentary, what really, uh, you know, uh, first off the, uh, kind of disingenuousness of, uh, you know, the 10th amendment being so important and the until it's not, um, you know, the hypocrisy there was striking, um, but, but also then the ignorance around the comment about the opioid crisis and linking that to, to cannabis where if anything, cannabis is a solution. Uh, did you happen to cap catch that? Uh, that portion of the commentary

Speaker 2: that's course I watched that press conference and it's just nothing more than another alternative fact being put forth by that administration that doesn't have any basis. In fact, it proves their ignorance and the fact that they're not looking at real data before they comment on topics of such importance. Uni knows that that medical marijuana is actually bringing down the use of opioids and that in states where it's legalized, there's less abuse and there's less problem with overdose. I'm in the states that marijuana is legal. The statement is a complete, just not even true in the slightest. And in fact, it's dangerous and harmful to America to be making statements like that.

Speaker 3: So, uh, yeah, no. And then as far as statements are concerned, um, we need to state obviously that the press secretary does not set policy, although he, you know, he, he did certainly sound informed. He kind of checked without name checking Rohrabacher Farr. So, um, you know, uh, yes, he doesn't make policy, but he did sound informed, right?

Speaker 2: Yeah. I mean, what he sounded like he knew is that the, that attorney general sessions really was interested in going after adult use of marijuana. He sounded like he had some kind of knowledge that, that policy was being discussed and that we could see some action on it. And that was worrisome. I mean, on, on the flip side, like you're saying, he did mention the amendment that was passed by Congress. Hopefully it'll continue to be passed or maybe we'll get a budget one of these days and it'll just be in there. He did mention that that the robotic or amendment was going to be enforced, which is great because that means that the, um, the Department of Justice won't be spending money enforcing federal law in medical marijuana states that's positive, but that whole other flip of the coin, the alternative facts and the fact that they're going to waste time and money going after adult personal users of marijuana.

Speaker 2: That is just disgusting. The other thing I didn't like is calling marijuana recreational use. I'm not even sure what that means. The recreational use of marijuana. I mean people use marijuana for their own personal uses. Recreational is just another word that has no meaning and does this. It's just meant to diminish the importance that marijuana plays in people's lives and to try and differentiate hugely between adult personal use of marijuana and medical marijuana is again, just nonsense. People use marijuana because it helps them feel better whether they're, whether they're adult personal users or medical marijuana users. It makes people feel better and that's why they use it.

Speaker 3: It's all about wellness and uh, and an absolutely we kind of way back when, you know, Kinda stopped using the word recreational when a Denver voted it in and, and instead started calling it the adult use for that very reason. Um, okay. So, uh, as far as action being taken, you know, a, again, you're the first person I thought of as far as a, I can't believe I'm going to say it, but raid preparedness, uh, you know, obviously they have rates have been going on consistently but not in, in a real way other than in parts of California. Um, but you know, here we are, uh, we've got, uh, the administration saying that they are going to do this whether they do or not. It is a, I would imagine in businesses, best interests to be prepared for sed rates. Yeah,

Speaker 2: absolutely. You know, we founded Americans for safe access, the medical marijuana advocacy group way back when, when the feds were rating medical marijuana dispensary. His dispensary isn't providers. Every Wednesday 6:00 AM, they would read someone and we had to get prepared. We had to, we had to know what to do. If the police came to our house, we had to know our rights, so we would preserve our rights and a trial. Um, you have to understand the constitution so that we can protect ourselves. We had to know a little bit about cop tactics with the cops do what kind of tricks do they use on us. We get to know about jury nullification if we did go to try what the jury of our peers, how they could help and we had to put it all together in a package and teach people, you know, of course we thought, you know, maybe five years ago we started to think, well maybe we don't have to be as prepared for rates anymore, but I for sure at Magnolia wellness, we trained our staff just about a week and a half ago, we did a raid preparedness training with our staff. We brought in the Americans for safe access staff. A couple of people dropped dressed up as cops and we, we rated ourselves five, six different ways so we can see what it would look like. And it's time people have to learn these tactics again. They have to know their rights, they have to get prepared and be ready for this.

Speaker 3: Yeah, I'll try to make my way down to DC and see stuff and get her thoughts as well from, from, uh, Americans for safe access. But in the meantime, while we're talking here, if, if I'm a business owner, um, you know, and I have adult use cannabis in my hands, um, what are these key principles to, uh, to, to, to heed? In other words, let's just go down one by one. If someone shows up at your doorstep, um, you know, and they are in the process of rating you. What are the first things to think? What are the first things to do

Speaker 2: right? You know, I'd say back it up, know your state and local laws and follow them. You won't, you don't want to get ready to do. You don't want to get in trouble. Follow the local and state laws. That's first. So make sure that you're not violating the regulations right in your hometown. Second, make sure you can stand in front of a jury of your peers if you do get rated and that your peers will support you. We saw in California early on in one of the rates, I'm one of the operators made a rap video and they made a throne and they sat on the throne with a big pile of marijuana and money. They're still in prison for 20 years because the jury of their peers couldn't support even their medical marijuana advocacy if they were going to pair it with the throne and giant piles of money.

Speaker 2: Make sure you're unimpeachable and do things that meet the law and that the jury of your peers will support. If you're, make sure you're prepared in for a raid. Make sure you have a phone tree so that if something happens in your rated, somebody knows who to call, that they can let your family know that you've been rated. Make plans for your pets. Make plans to take care of your children. If you had children so somebody can get a call out to your lawyer, make sure you have a lawyer in advance. If you have a lawyer now you might get advice that'll prevent the raid, right, but ultimately you would, if you don't have a lawyer and you go and get one after a raid, it's so much more expensive to get a lawyer now and get them on retainer. Now

Speaker 3: when you said the phone tree and just take us through the key principles of the phone tree you kind of did from a a business and a personal perspective, but, but identify, you know how to set that up in the best way possible.

Speaker 2: Well ready to look like this. The police are prepared. They don't just come busting in. I mean unless there's an emergency need to do so. So they've done some surveillance. They know what time you open, what time you close and they're going to do a raid at some time in the morning. That's not going to have a bunch of medical marijuana patients in the facility. So they're going to come in early. So whoever your early staff is, they might be rated by the by the police, and then what happens is that the other staff members start to show up, or your patient members start to show up and they notice the place is going to be is being rated. Those are the people on the outside who needs to put out the alert to the lawyer, to the families of the people that are inside and also to your supporters so they know, hey, debbie and seth are inside.

Speaker 2: They're being rated. Can Get a crowd outside if you can, protesting, letting the community know, look what's happening in our community. The feds have walked in against the laws of our community and their rating, our beloved marijuana dispensary. It needs to make an issue of it and make it. You have to be safe, but you have to make it known to the federal government that the voters and the citizens of our community do not support that. And the best way to do it is to have support outside of a raid right when it's happening. So your phone tree or early year staff members should all know the phone tree. Some of your key patients should know the phone tree, your closest neighbors should have a copy of the phone tree and when they see something going, call the first person on the list. It might be the lawyer, it might be your pr person, it might be the two or three top staff members so they can so they can put out the alert to the community members to come protest to the media to come down so that they can observe and make sure that the police behave and that patients don't get hurt and, and to your staff so that they know that the rate is happening and that they can come down and provides support to people who are stuck on the inside.

Speaker 3: Okay. So, uh, so there you have it. That's what's happening on the phones. That's what's happening outside. That's obviously what's happening inside a. let's dive in as far as what's happening inside. What should you be prepared for them to say to you and what should you be prepared to say back to them?

Speaker 2: Well, we have to know are we have to know the words, we have to know that we have rights and we have to preserve those rights. So the main thing you have to know is everything you say can and will be used against you, whether you're under arrest or whether the police are just having a casual conversation with you to decide if they're going to arrest you so you have to know the key magic words. And, and this is what they are. I choose to remain silent and I want to see my lawyer. Now what happens when you say these words? They're magic because they enact that when you say them, the you are supposed to get a chance to talk to your lawyer. And the other thing is, is that the police are supposed to stop questioning, questioning you. So they're supposed to stop applying the pressure of asking questions to you if you're under, if you're under arrest, um, unfortunately, what does it they don't have to do?

Speaker 2: They don't have to stop talking between themselves. So they might, they might stop saying, seth, tell us where the marijuana is set. Is this your marijuana? When you say the magic words and you're under arrest, they have to stop questioning you until your lawyer comes here. But what they can do is talk to each other. Whoa. Did you see all that weed that says had. I know that sets marijuana. You know when his lawyer comes here, he's going to have to tell us they're trying to shake you up. So you start talking again. So you have to understand that you have a constitutional right to say your magic words. You can't just remain silent. You have to say, I choose to remain silence and I want to see my lawyer. And then you need to stick to that. No matter how unpleasant the police officers talking around you are, the only thing you should say is I choose to remain silent and I want to see my lawyer.

Speaker 2: Now, hopefully you've memorized your lawyers office phone number so that you can phone them or somebody who's on the outside knows who your lawyer is or they've notified your family and your family knows who your lawyer is. Your lawyer knows you're there and they can come and get to, or you need to understand how do I get a public defender and you need to understand that process before you get arrested so you're not on the inside thinking. The police are your friends who are going to tell you how everything works, so educate yourself in advance. There's one other set of magic words. I do not consent to this search. You need to say that no matter what, even if the police show up at your place with a search warrant, with your name, your address, today's date, and exactly what they're gonna look at. You have to say, I do not consent to this search because please make mistakes and that search might not be legal and if you consent to the search, you've led them in. Everything they find as a result of that search is theirs to use against you. In a court of law, right? If you say, I do not consent to this search and you stick to that, if there is a problem with the search, if the warrant is wrong, if they make a mistake, you can fight back against it because you have to use your magic words every time without fail.

Speaker 3: All right, so those are two obvious, obviously extremely important phrases. What are other things to do and not do? I guess I'll ask a 21st century question as opposed to in 19 nineties question, should I make sure that someone is uh, you know, taking video with a phone or should I make sure that they aren't what, what, what are we doing as far as that kind of digital data capture?

Speaker 2: Also go to the website, a Berkeley cop lunch, because there's a lot of info there on how citizens can play a role in protecting the rights of people who are being arrested. Police are dangerous. They're heavily armed. They're there to arrest us. We have to treat them like grizzly bears. We have to move very slowly around them. We have to stay very far away from them, we can never touch them. We have to act like citizens observer, standing safely away from the fray and videotaping carefully and there is an art to not getting, you know, billy clubs by the police when you are a citizen cop watching and it's a very delicate art. So people should take a look at Berkeley cop watch and learn some of these techniques and you'll find a lot more about these, know your rights techniques also about your rights during a raid and how to use the magic words on there on their website too.

Speaker 2: So I think, I think the main thing is around police. You act like it's an underwater ballet. You know, you have your hands up when they come in the door for a raid, but your hands go up real slow, you know, because. Because you want to show them that there's not a gun in your hand when they ask for your Id. You say it like this. Yes, officer. My ideas in my back pocket. Is it okay with you if I take my right hand and slowly reached behind me and get my wallet from the pocket so I can show you? And when they say yes, you very slowly move your hand back there. If they say, show me Your Id and you just whip your hand to your back pocket. They've got to wonder if you're going back there for your weapon and you might find yourself in, you know, accidentally harmed as a result of that.

Speaker 2: So be very careful, um, and follow their instructions when it comes to how you move and how you act, um, hands away from your body. Very key. Um, the other thing that people have to know is cops can lie. Cops can smoke weed, for example, as a part of the job, please can take you in one room and your friends in another room if you're under arrest and tell you, Debbie told me it was Yusef. Yeah. And then on the, in the other room, they can be telling you, seth, Debbie said all the weed was years. We're both sitting there having invoked our right, seeing nothing, but they're lying to us to try and get us to snitch on each other. People have to know the cops can lie. The only one you can trust when you're under arrest are being detained by the police is your lawyer. That's why you say your magic words. I choose to remain and you wait until your lawyer is there so they can interpret the truth for you.

Speaker 3: What about asking the question? Am I under arrest?

Speaker 4: Okay.

Speaker 2: Yeah. You know, sometimes it's hard to tell if you are under arrest or not because the police like to have casual conversations with people so they can see if they can fish out enough information to put you under arrest. So when the police are around the. Oh, they said, come here, we want to ask you a couple of questions. You need to be like, wait a minute, am I being detained right now and I have to stay here and answer your questions or can I go? So it's like this set coming out. I want to ask you a couple questions. Officer, am I being detained right now? No, you're not. Okay. I got to go. And if they say yes you are. Do you know what to say? I choose to remain silent. Edit, like to see my.

Speaker 3: Oh, I do know what to say. You just taught me.

Speaker 2: Then they are questioning you to try and find enough info to arrest you.

Speaker 3: Right? Okay. You have to be careful. Um, as far as you know, other things that might be said and other things that, uh, that, that you might say or you shouldn't say or you should. Uh, I want to make sure to touch on those if you've got them. But I also want to ask you if there is no search warrant, is there a way to kind of, uh, you know, ask them to leave politely.

Speaker 2: There's no search warrant. Can you ask them a ton of lightly leave the police can search if they feel like there is a crime in progress, exigent circumstances. So if the police come to your door

Speaker 2: it because they want to casually have a conversation with you. Oh, we're just meeting people in the neighborhood today. We thought we'd wander up to your door, uh, you know, of course, you'd immediately go like, why are you doing that? Sounds fishy already. You know, your kid, you notice, you notice the police are engaging you in casual conversation. You know what I would do at the door if it's the police, I step outside the door, close it, and lock it behind me and I been, I say a Ca, a casual conversation. Okay, you're here just to say hi. Sorry, I got to go and I would just walk away. That's it. If you notice that you're engaged in casual conversation with the police, walk away. If you have to ask them, am I being detained before you walk away asking me if you're being detained and then you walk away.

Speaker 2: If they're coming to your house without a search warrant for casual conversation and they smelled marijuana on your porch and it's not legal where you are, they might consider that to be exigent circumstances and you might find them busting into your house. Now, under the same circumstances, if you open the door, find the police out there, they smelled the marijuana, but you've already stepped out and locked the door. They might think it's too much of a hassle, right? If you didn't close the door and you're just standing there with the door wide open and they can smell the marijuana and they see it wafting out, they might push right past you and come in. That's why you step outside and lock the door behind you and end up on the porch of the plea,

Speaker 3: which also works at the place of business as well.

Speaker 2: Exactly. That's right. All right.

Speaker 3: Other key principles, other key things to know to do if this were to happen?

Speaker 2: Yeah, I mean we should talk about jury nullification a little bit. Juries are really our friends in this situation. There are folders there, jury of our peers. There are people who probably predominantly voted for the law. If they're really representative of your peers and you're in the legal marijuana state and you need them to, they to do their job as jurors. The jurors have a right? Uh, you know, I don't know the ins and outs of the exact law, but the point being the juries can judge the law, the merits of the law as well as the merits of what happened. So the jury can find you innocent in a marijuana case if they find the law is what's the crime. So we, we have to educate juries about the fact that they can vote, they can, they can free, they can use the right to jury nullification to vote not guilty and marijuana cases and decide defendant's free.

Speaker 2: So we have to teach people about jury nullification before they can become jurors because you can't educate seated jurors about hurry nullification when it comes to any specific case. That's a crime. So what we really need to do is start educating people about the rights of jurors to judge the law as well as the case and to set people free if they find the law is actually running afoul of our Constitution and democracy and the will of the people. And this has been successful in a, in an ever increasing number of marijuana cases. And I think that we're going to have to turn to jury nullification again if the feds come into California, Colorado, or these other legal states, we really need to show the fence. The jury of our peers voted for this law. It's the federal law, that's the crime. It's not the California law and our jurors have to start setting people free. And if enough juror, if enough defendants get set free because of how fellow these laws are, that the jury is just won't find people guilty. Guilty of the crimes that they're alleging the feds are going to start prosecuting. So I think it's very important that we all learn more about jury nullification, that we educate people who might be on jurors, that we educate every citizen about the rights of the juries and, um, that we'd be prepared to go to trial and win these cases.

Speaker 3: All right, well, uh, you know, uh, this is, this is all good. And uh, uh, unfortunately, uh, timely information and, and Debbie, I can't thank you enough. Um, you know, we'll, we'll certainly check back in with you as we hear a little bit more, but, you know, before I go, I mean, how's, uh, how's the Magnolia ship sailing? How are we doing over there?

Speaker 2: Oh, we're having a great time in Oakland. Um, well, well until yesterday we're were preparing for the state law to change and you know, maybe adult users to finally stop being arrested in California and across the, you know, the more and more so across the u s, but Magnolia is a medical marijuana facility. It's going great. I can't believe how good it's going. Um, we are doing the buildout on our onsite consumption lounge at cannabis cafe right now. We're fully permitted waiting to receive the first draft policy for medical marijuana in the nation. We have to get this insurance policy that allows people to consume marijuana on site and then leave the facility and just like at a bar, if you had a car accident or some problem when you left, that insurance policy is very difficult to get and we'll have the first policy for marijuana as soon as we get that policy, which we expect any day now. So we're very excited about that. Wow. Excellent. Yes. And we just got permission from the city to host a medical. Marijuana. Farmers are good in our parking lot, so we'll have a lead just measured the space today. We can have 15 farmers in the parking lot. Um, our tentative date is coming up in about 30 days in March and we're really looking forward to that.

Speaker 3: That's awesome. The first a farmer's market and less. There's been another one that, uh, that sounds pretty great. Cannabis for a farmer's market, right? Yes. Going to be great. All right. And, and of course, uh, how is, uh, how is my friend, Barbara Blazer?

Speaker 2: My mom, she's great. She's doing really good. She's a 71 year old nurse who retired for about five days and then came to work at Magnolia wellness with me. Started using medical marijuana herself just at age 70 and just loves it and just having a great time. She's on vacation right now, so she's having fun. I'm getting pictures from the Monterey Aquarium on. They too big,

Speaker 3: having a great time. That's fantastic. Alright, so. So we'll do the final question now. I'm going to change it. I'm going to do something unique. I'm going to, uh, for the soundtrack of your life. I'm going to share what I know your answer is, if you don't mind giving me a song for the soundtrack of my life. So I know by now that the song that must be on the soundtrack of your life is sugar magnolia. Right? Right. Now, do you have a different song for me by any chance? For my soundtrack?

Speaker 2: The song, the song I'm thinking for you visit Steve Miller band. What's it called? The big jet airplane.

Speaker 3: Oh, big old gender liner. I don't even know if that's where they get on the plane in a whole new world and ended up with exactly what they want. Uh, that is, uh, I'll take it from Debbie goldsberry. No question, Debbie. You know, I am always thrilled to talk to you. I can't believe that this is what the content of our conversation conversation is. But, um, I am past that. I really did. I can't believe it. Well, you know, I'll tell ya, it's a, it really is. I'm getting a little choked up. It's, it's amazing that we've got people like you who know exactly what to do in circumstances like this and for that, I'm truly grateful. I'm definitely here anytime. Thank God

Speaker 1: Debbie Goldsberry. I understand that if you win an election, you get to do what you want in regards to policy. I understand that if you want to install secretaries to departments to simply dismantled those departments, hey, that's what the voters voted for. But where is the consistency as it relates to the voters voting for their states' rights?

Read the full transcript:

Become a member to access to webinars, quarterly reports, contributor columns, shows, excerpts, and complete podcast transcripts

Become a Member

Already a member? Login here.

Subscribe now to get every episode.

Cannabis Economy is a real-time history of legal cannabis. We chronicle how personal and industry histories have combined to provide our current reality.